Finnish for busy people

Että-Participle – Referatiivirakenne

The että-participle can be called by many names:

  • Että-partisiippi (että-participle)
  • Referatiivirakenne (reference construction)
  • Referatiivinen lauseenvastike (reference substitute construction)
Table of Contents
  1. What are Participles?
  2. The Use of the Reference Structure
  3. The Reference Structure – Subjects
    1. When the subject in both sentences is the same
    2. When the subject in both sentences is different
  4. The Reference Structure – Tenses
    1. When the tense in both sentences is the same
    2. When the tense in both sentences is different
  5. The Reference Structure – Passive Sentences

1. What are Participles?

A participle is a specific form of the verb, used to either turn a verb into an adjective, noun or to replace a subordinate clause.

Finnish has a bunch of participles:

All these participles can be used in a multitude of different ways. In this article, we will be looking at how participles can replace an että-sentence (eg. Tiedän, että hän on se oikea minulle).

The reference construction is the name of the replacement clause which contains a participle. You can makes reference construction (referatiivirakenne) which contain any of the above participles. However, you can’t make negative sentences into a reference construction!

2. The Use of the Reference Structure

Below, you can find the most common verbs to appear in the reference structure. As was to be expected, all these verbs are the kind that generally get followed by “että“: for example, tiedän että (I knew that…); muistan että (I remember that…); and kuulen että (I hear that…).

Finnish English
Anni luulee hänen olevan kotona. Anni thinks he’s at home.
Anni tietää hänen olevan kotona. Anni knows he’s at home
Anni muistaa hänen olevan kotona. Anni remembers that he’s at home.
Anni kertoo hänen olevan kotona. Anni tells that he’s at home.
Anni sanoi hänen olevan kotona. Anni said that he’s at home.
Anni kuuli hänen olevan kotona. Anni heard that he was at home.
Anni näki hänen olevan kotona. Anni saw that he was at home.
Anni huomasi hänen olevan kotona. Anni noticed that he was at home.
Anni uskoi hänen olevan kotona. Anni believed that he was at home.
Anni väitti hänen olevan kotona. Anni claimed that he was at home.
Anni lupasi hänen olevan kotona. Anni promised that he was at home.
Anni epäili hänen olevan kotona. Anni suspected that he was at home.
Anni arveli hänen olevan kotona. Anni guessed that he was at home.
Anni huomautti hänen olevan kotona. Anni pointed out that he was at home.
Anni muisteli hänen olevan kotona. Anni recalled him being at home.

3.The Reference Structure – Subjects

First, we’ll take a look at what kind of an effect the subjects of both the main sentence and the että-sentence.

3.1. When the subject in both sentences is the same

When you have the same subject in both your main sentence and your subordinate clause (which I call an “että-sentence”), you will need to use a possessive suffix.

Että-sentences with same subject Referatiivirakenne with possessive suffix
Minä luulen, että olen taas myöhässä. Minä luulen olevani taas myöhässä.
Sinä luulet, että olet taas myöhässä. Sinä luulet olevasi taas myöhässä.
Hän luulee, että hän on taas myöhässä. Hän luulee olevansa taas myöhässä.
Me luulemme, että olemme taas myöhässä. Me luulemme olevamme taas myöhässä.
Te luulette, että olette taas myöhässä. Te luulette olevanne taas myöhässä.
He luulevat, että he ovat taas myöhässä. He luulevat olevansa taas myöhässä.

3.2. When the subject in both sentences is different

Sometimes your main sentence (eg. hän tietää–) and your subordinate clause (eg. –että minä rakastan häntä) each have a different subject. In the example sentence I just mentioned, the main sentence has “hän” as the subject, while the subordinate clause has “minä” as a subject.

In those cases, you will not use a possessive suffix. Instead, you will use the genetive for the subject of the että-sentence and put the verb in the participle’s genetive form (osaa-va-n, tietä-nee-n).

Että-sentences with different subject Referatiivirakenne with personal pronoun
Minä luulen, että hän on taas myöhässä. Minä luulen hänen olevan taas myöhässä.
Sinä luulet, että hän on taas myöhässä. Sinä luulet hänen olevan taas myöhässä.
Hän luulee, että minä olen taas myöhässä. Hän luulee minun olevan taas myöhässä.
Me luulemme, että sinä olet taas myöhässä. Me luulemme sinun olevan taas myöhässä.
Te luulette, että minä olen taas myöhässä. Te luulette minun olevan taas myöhässä.
He luulevat, että me olemme taas myöhässä. He luulevat meidän olevan taas myöhässä.

4. The Reference Construction – Tenses

Next, the actions of the main sentence and the että-sentence can be happening at the same time, or one after the other. This will have an influence on the participle used to replace the että-sentence.

4.1. When the tense in both sentences is the same

When both the main sentence and the että-sentence appear in the same tense, you will use the present participle. This can mean that both the sentences are in the present tense (minä luulen, että olen myöhässä) or that both the sentences are in the past tense (minä luulin, että olin myöhässä).

Below, I’m mixing both sentences where the person of both sentences is the same and sentences where they are different.

Että-sentences with same tense Present participle
Minä luulen, että minä olen taas myöhässä. Minä luulen olevani taas myöhässä.
Minä luulin, että minä olin taas myöhässä. Minä luulin olevani taas myöhässä.
Sinä luulet, että minä olen taas myöhässä. Sinä luulet minun olevan taas myöhässä.
Sinä luulit, että minä olin taas myöhässä. Sinä luulit minun olevan taas myöhässä.
Minä luulen, että sinä olet taas myöhässä. Minä luulen sinun olevan taas myöhässä.
Minä luulin, että sinä olit taas myöhässä. Minä luulin sinun olevan taas myöhässä.

4.2. When the tense in both sentences is different

When the act of the main sentence happens later than the “että”-sentence, you will use the past participle. This can be visible in the että-sentence, but it isn’t always. When both actions are conjugated in the past tense, it can be hard to see straight up whether they both happened at the same point of time in the past, or if one of them happened even further in the past.

In the following examples, the idea is that the että-sentence happened earlier than the main sentence.

Että-sentences with different tense Past participle
Minä tiedän, että minä olin kotona silloin. Minä tiedän olleeni kotona silloin.
Minä tiesin, että minä olin ollut kotona silloin. Minä tiesin olleeni kotona silloin.
Minä tiedän, että sinä olit kotona silloin. Minä tiedän sinun olleen kotona silloin.
Minä tiesin, että sinä olit ollut kotona silloin. Minä tiesin sinun olleen kotona silloin.
Sinä tiedät, että minä olin kotona silloin. Sinä tiedät minun olleen kotona silloin.
Sinä tiesit, että minä olin ollut kotona silloin. Sinä tiesit minun olleen kotona silloin.

5. The Reference Construction – Passive Sentences

While it is possible to use the reference construction with passive sentences, it’s really rare and used solely in official written sources. You won’t be required to produce sentences like this actively.

For passive sentences, the main sentence can either have an active verb (eg. Minä luulen, että saadaan hernekeittoa torstaina) or a passive verb (eg. Torstaina luullaan, että sadaan hernekeittoa).

As you can see below, the passive doesn’t use any possessive suffixes, but it does have two participles it uses: the present passive participle (-TAVA) and the past passive participle (-TU).

Että-sentence Referatiivirakenne
Luulen, että merestä saadaan paljon kalaa. Luulen merestä saatavan paljon kalaa.
Britit epäilevät, että Dianaa kohdeltiin huonosti. Britit epäilevät Dianaa kohdeltavan huonosti.
Katsotaan, että riskit voidaan ottaa Riskit katsotaan voitavan ottaa.
Luulin, että tästä puhuttiin eilen. Luulin tästä puhutun eilen.
Suomessa tiedetään, että jääkiekkoa pelattiin jo 1800-luvulla. Suomessa tiedetään jääkiekkoa pelatun jo 1800-luvulla.
5 1 vote
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

4 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Rando

Hi
Shouldn’t the colors on the 5.th point (reference construction) examples sentences > tava as green and n red

(As with the 2 other examples(With TU))

Inge (admin)

Yeah, the colors for those few didn’t make sense. This has been a tricky article to color code because of the different elements throughout the page. I decided to add some purple to hopefully make things easier to understand. Thanks! 🙂

Max

Hello, Inge!
I wanted to ask you about the part about different tenses. As I can see, both sentences are technically in the same tense, with only implications that they happened with some time apart in between them. I want to ask especially about sentences where both parts are in imperfect: why isn’t past perfect used to signify that once action happened further away in the past than another past action? Is the assumption of one action being further away in the past purely up to the person then?

Inge (admin)

Hei Max!

While thinking this over, I decided to change the examples sentences in that section to ones that indeed make use of the imperfect + past perfect. It’s easier to understand them like that. You were right though! In the sentences with two imperfects, we’re mostly relying on the context to tell us that they happened with some time apart in between them.
The new sentences are all variations on “Minä tiedän, että olin kotona silloin.” In these, the past perfect does work very well.

The original “Minä luulin, että minä olin taas myöhässä” type sentences don’t work well with the past perfect. I think this is mostly due to the verb luulla which, in combination with the past perfect, gives the impression that this is “hearsay”: I wasn’t there myself to notice that I was late. That’s just too weird of a situation, so “olin ollut” doesn’t sound right.

Thank you for your comment! I think you just helped make the article a little bit easier to understand for others!