Huom! This website is currently under heavy construction!

The Relative Pronoun Joka – Joka-pronomini

Relative pronouns are used to start a subordinate clause (a side-sentence, sivulause). ”Joka” in its different forms gets translated as ”what”, ”who”, ”whom” and ”whose”, as well as ”which” in English. It can be inflected in all the cases. The relative pronoun joka refers to the word right before it. In that way it differs from the relative pronoun mikä.

Table of Contents
  1. The Inflection of the Relative pronoun Joka
  2. The Use of the Relative Pronoun Joka
    1. Joka (nominative)
    2. Jotka (T-plural)
    3. Jota (partitive)
    4. Jonka (genetive)
    5. Jossa (inessive)
    6. Josta (elative)
    7. Johon (illative)
    8. Jolla (adessive)
    9. Jolta (ablative)
    10. Jolle (allative)

1. The Inflection of the Relative Pronoun Joka

Cases Singular Plural
Nominative joka jotka
Partitive jota joita
Genetive jonka joiden
Mihin? johon joihin
Missä? jossa joissa
Mistä? josta joista
Mille? jolle joille
Millä? jolla joilla
Miltä? jolta joilta

 

As you can see, the relative pronoun ”joka” can be inflected in all the cases, both singular and plural. However, in the parts below this table, I will be focusing solely on the singular. The plural works in the exact same way.

2. The Use of the Relative Pronoun Joka

When you have two sentences that both have a noun in common, you can make these two sentences into one by using ”joka”.

Finnish English
Kirja, joka on mielenkiintoinen, on pöydällä. The book [that is interesting] is on the table.
Kirja, joka on pöydällä, on mielenkiintoinen. The book [that is on the table] is interesting.

As you can see from these examples:

  • The ”joka sentence” appears right after the word it refers to. It is located in the middle of the main sentence.
  • The ”joka sentence” will contain information that’s already known, while the end of the sentence will contain the new information.
  • You will have two commas in these sentences, which are placed around the joka sentence. This is something that many Finns forget when they’re writing. Thus, it’s not really that important.

1.1. Joka (nominative)

”Joka” is the most basic of the list, since it’s in the nominative (aka the basic form). The word both sentences have in common appears in its basic form. Because of that, when they’re connected, the pronoun will be in its basic form as well. The nominative will usually be used when the reference word is the subject in both sentences.

Finnish English
Tyttö on iloinen. Tyttö laulaa. Tyttö, joka laulaa, on iloinen.
Talvi loppuu kohta. Talvi on ollut pitkä. Talvi, joka loppuu kohta, on ollut pitkä.
Tuo mies on suomalainen. Tuo mies on tummatukkainen. Tuo mies, joka on suomalainen, on tummatukkainen.

1.2. Jotka (T-plural, plural nominative)

”Jotka” is the plural form of ”joka”. Both sentences have the same subject, which appears in the T-plural.

Finnish English
Tytöt ovat iloisia. Tytöt laulavat. Tytöt, jotka laulavat, ovat iloisia.
Talvet alkavat joulukuussa. Talvet ovat pitkiä. Talvet, jotka alkavat joulukuussa, ovat pitkiä.
Nuo miehet ovat suomalaisia. Nuo miehet ovat tummatukkaisia. Nuo miehet, jotka ovat suomalaisia, ovat tummatukkaisia.

1.3. Jota (partitive)

The partitive form of ”joka” is usually used when the subject of the first sentence appears as an object in the second sentence. There are many verbs that require their object to be in the partitive case, eg. auttaa, odottaa and rakastaa.

Finnish English
Tyttö on iloinen. Minä rakastan tyttöä.
Tyttö, jota rakastan, on iloinen.
Talvi loppuu kohta. Me vihasimme talvea.
Talvi, jota me vihasimme, on ollut pitkä.
Tuo mies on suomalainen. Anja auttaa mies. Tuo mies, jota Anja auttaa, on suomalainen.

1.4. Jonka (genetive)

The genetive is used in a couple of different situations, eg. to express possession, as the marker for the object and in necessity sentences.

Finnish English
Tyttö on iloinen. Tytön täytyy siivota.
Tyttö, jonka täytyy siivota, on iloinen.
Talvi loppuu kohta. Talven yöt ovat pitkiä.
Talvi, jonka yöt ovat pitkiä, loppuu kohta.
Tuo mies on suomalainen. Tuon miehen tukka on ruskea. Tuo mies, jonka tukka on ruskea, on suomalainen.

1.5. Jossa (inessive)

”Jossa” answers the question ”missä?” and mainly refers to locations.

Finnish English
Tyttö on iloinen. Tytössä on paljon hyvää. Tyttö, jossa on paljon hyvää, on iloinen.
Pankki on keskustassa. Tyttö on töissä pankissa. Pankki, jossa tyttö on töissä, on keskustassa.
Tuo kauppa on kallis. Tuossa kaupassa myydään viiniä. Tuo kauppa, jossa myydään viiniä, on kallis.

1.6. Josta (elative)

”Josta” answers the question ”mistä?” and usually refers to locations. It can also be used in certain location case rections (eg. tykätä).

Finnish English
Tyttö on iloinen. Poika tykkää tytöstä. Tyttö, josta poika tykkää, on iloinen.
Pankki on keskustassa. Tyttö tulee pankista. Pankki, josta tyttö tulee, on keskustassa.
Tuo mies on suomalainen. Tytöt puhuvat miehestä. Tuo mies, josta tytöt puhuvat, on suomalainen.

1.7. Johon (illative)

”Johon” answers the question ”mihin?”, which is one of the location cases. The illative also has some verb rections you might find useful to know (eg. rakastua ja tottua).

Finnish English
Tyttö on iloinen. Poika on ihastunut tyttöön. Tyttö, johon poika on ihastunut, on iloinen.
Talvi loppuu kohta. Olen tottunut talveen. Talvi, johon olen tottunut, loppuu kohta.
Pankki on keskustassa. Tyttö menee pankkiin. Pankki, johon tyttö menee, on keskustassa.

1.8. Jolla (adessive)

”Jolla” answers the question ”millä?”, and more often to the question ”kenellä?”. This has to do with the Finnish ”minulla on” sentence construction.

Finnish English
Tyttö on iloinen. Tytöllä on poikaystävä. Tyttö, jolla on poikaystävä, on iloinen.
Auto on punainen. Menen pankkiin autolla. Auto, jolla menen pankkiin, on punainen.
Lusikka on pieni. Syön muroja lusikalla. Pankki, jolla syön muroja, on pieni.

1.9. Jolta (ablative)

”Jolta” answers the question ”miltä?”, and more often to the question ”keneltä?”. It’s used when you get/buy/take/steal something from someone, as well as with the perceptional verbs.

Finnish English
Tyttö on iloinen. Sain lahjan tytöltä. Tyttö, jolta sain lahjan, on iloinen.
Tuo mies on ystävä. Lainaan tuolta mieheltä rahaa. Tuo mies, jolta lainaan rahaa, on ystävä.
Kukka on ruusu. Anna tuoksuu kukalta. Kukka, jolta Anna tuoksuu, on ruusu.

1.10. Jolle (allative)

”Jolle” answers the question ”mille?”, and more often to the question ”kenelle?”.

Finnish English
Tyttö on iloinen. Annoin lahjan tytölle. Tyttö, jolle annoin lahjan, on iloinen.
Tuo mies on ystävä. Lainaan tuolle miehelle rahaa. Tuo mies, jolle lainaan rahaa, on ystävä.
Tori on täynnä ihmisiä. Minä menen torille. Tori, jolle menen, on täynnä ihmisiä.

 

 

Leave a Comment

Sähköpostiosoitettasi ei julkaista. Pakolliset kentät on merkitty *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.