Finnish for busy people

Old Words versus New Words Ending in -i

There are many words that end in -i in Finnish. Unfortunately – due to the many different changes – their inflection in the different cases can cause some confusion and frustration among learners of Finnish. Let’s take a look!

The biggest portion of words ending in -i are new (eg. lasi : lasin : lasia : laseja). However, there are several categories of old words, like vesi (veden, vettä, vesiä), joki (joen, jokea, jokia) or lohi (lohen, lohta, lohia). There are some other unexpected things going on with old words versus new words ending in -i. Learn more now!

I will be listing the following cases as examples for the inflection of these words:

  1. The partitive case
  2. The genetive case
  3. The inessive case
  4. The plural partitive

1. New Words ending in -i

We will start our article on old words versus new words with the new ones. New words are often loanwords. Usually they’re recognisable because they resemble words in other languages, like pankki for ”bank”, or paperi for ”paper”. Loanwords are easier than Finnish words because they don’t undergo as many changes when you add endings: you basically just add the ending to the basic form of the word in most cases.

1.1. Short new words ending in -i

  • Partitive: basic form +a/ä
  • Genetive: basic form +n
  • Missä: basic form +ssa/ssä
  • Plural Partitive: remove –i and add –eja/ejä
Nominative Partitive Genetive Missä Plural Partitive
bussi bussia bussin bussissa busseja
halli hallia hallin hallissa halleja
hissi hissiä hissin hississä hissejä
kahvi kahvia kahvin kahvissa kahveja
kani kania kanin kanissa kaneja
kassi kassia kassin kassissa kasseja
kasvi kasvia kasvin kasvissa kasveja
kortti korttia kortin kortissa kortteja
koti kotia kodin kodissa koteja
kuitti kuittia kuitin kuitissa kuitteja
kurssi kurssia kurssin kurssissa kursseja
laji lajia lajin lajissa lajeja
laki lakia lain laissa lakeja
lasi lasia lasin lasissa laseja
maali maalia maalin maalissa maaleja
mökki mökkiä mökin mökissä mökkejä
pankki pankkia pankin pankissa maaleja
pappi pappia papin papissa pappeja
passi passia passin passissa passeja
peli peliä pelin pelissä pelejä
pussi pussia pussin pussissa pusseja
siili siiliä siilin siilissä siilejä
taksi taksia taksin taksissa takseja
teksti tekstiä tekstin tekstissä tekstejä
tiimi tiimiä tiimin tiimissä tiimejä
tunti tuntia tunnin tunnissa tunteja
tuoli tuolia tuolin tuolissa tuoleja
väri väriä värin värissä värejä

1.2. Long new words ending in -i: group one

As far as I can think, all the long words that end in -i are loanwords. Most of them end in -li or -ri.

While all long words mainly follow the same rules for each case, the plural partitive is an exception. I’m only listing one option for the plural partitive, but it’s good to know that there are often multiple options for this case.

For group one, all words have a short vowel in the one-but-last syllable (lää--ri). This is why these words have the ending –eita/eitä for the plural partitive.

  • Partitive: basic form +a/ä
  • Genetive: basic form +n
  • Missä: basic form +ssa/ssä
  • Plural Partitive for long words: learn more in this article.
Nominative Partitive Genetive Missä Plural Partitive
enkeli enkeliä enkelin enkelissä enkeleitä
kaakeli kaakelia kaakelin kaakelissa kaakeleita
lääkäri lääkäriä lääkärin lääkärissä lääkäreitä
moottori moottoria moottorin moottorissa moottoreita
mutteri mutteria mutterin mutterissa muttereita
naapuri naapuria naapurin naapurissa naapureita
paperi paperia paperin paperissa papereita
seteli seteliä setelin setelissä seteleitä
sipuli sipulia sipulin sipulissa sipuleita
symboli symbolia symbolin symbolissa symboleita

1.3. Long new words ending in -i: group two

For group two, all words have a long vowel in the one-but-last syllable (in-si-nöö-ri). These words have -eja/ejä in the plural partitive.

  • Partitive: basic form +a/ä
  • Genetive: basic form +n
  • Missä: basic form +ssa/ssä
  • Plural Partitive for long words: learn more in this article.
Nominative Partitive Genetive Missä Plural Partitive
amatööri amatööriä amatöörin amatöörissä amatöörejä
appelsiini appelsiinia appelsiinin appelsiinissa appelsiineja
banaani banaania banaanin banaanissa banaaneja
insinööri insinööriä insinöörin insinöörissä insinöörejä
jonglööri jonglööriä jonglöörin jonglöörissä jonglöörejä
krokotiili krokotiilia krokotiilin krokotiilissa krokotiileja
likööri likööriä liköörin liköörissä liköörejä
miljonääri miljonääriä miljonäärin miljonäärissä miljonäärejä

1.4. Long new words ending in -i: group three

Group three is for long new words ending in something else besides -li or -ri (eg. -tti or -si).

  • Partitive: basic form +a/ä
  • Genetive: basic form +n
  • Missä: basic form +ssa/ssä
  • Plural Partitive for long words: –eja/ejä
Nominative Partitive Genetive Missä Plural Partitive
arkkitehti arkkitehtia arkkitehdin arkkitehdissa arkkitehteja
konteksti kontekstia kontekstin kontekstissa konteksteja
poliisi poliisia poliisin poliisissa poliiseja
presidentti presidenttiä presidentin presidentissä presidenttejä
salaatti salaattia salaatin salaatissa salaatteja
turisti turistia turistin turistissa turisteja

2. Old words ending in -i

We’ve come to part two of the old words versus new words battle! Old words are very often nature words. After all, nature has been around for so long that Finns have had names for them since the very beginning. Some words’ age can be confusing, for example äiti “mother” is actually a new Finnish word, even though mothers have been around since the beginning of time!

2.1. The base rule for old words ending in -i

  • Partitive: remove –i and add –ea/-eä
  • Genetive: remove –i and add –en
  • Missä: remove –i and add –essa/-essä
  • Plural partitive: basic form +a/ä (rule for all old i-words)
Nominative Partitive Genetive Missä Plural Partitive
arki arkea arjen arjessa arkia
arpi arpea arven arvessa arpia
happi happea hapen hapessa happia
hauki haukea hauen hauessa haukia
helmi helmeä helmen helmessä helmiä
henki henkeä hengen hengessä henkiä
hirvi hirveä hirven hirvessä hirviä
joki jokea joen joessa jokia
järvi järveä järven järvessä järviä
kivi kiveä kiven kivessä kiviä
kylki kylkeä kyljen kyljessä kylkiä
lahti lahtea lahden lahdessa lahtia
lehti lehteä lehden lehdessä lehtiä
mäki mäkeä en essä mäkiä
nimi nimeä nimen nimessä nimiä
ovi ovea oven ovessa ovia
pilvi pilveä pilven pilvessä pilviä
polvi polvea polven polvessa polvia
putki putkea putken putkessa putkia
ripsi ripseä ripsen ripsessä ripsiä
rupi rupea ruven ruvessa rupia
sormi sormea sormen sormessa sormia
suomi suomea suomen suomessa suomia
talvi talvea talven talvessa talvia
tammi tammea tammen tammessa tammia
tuki tukea tuen tuessa tukia
tähti tähteä tähden tähdessä tähtiä
väki väkeä en essä väkiä

2.2. Old words ending in -si

More old words, but this time with –si at their end. It’s also important that this rule is only for old words, which means new words like kurssi (kurssia) and bussi (bussia) are excluded from this rule (see 1.1.).

  • Partitive: remove –si and add –tta/-ttä
  • Genetive: remove –si and add –den
  • Missä: remove –si and add –dessa/-dessä
  • Plural partitive: basic form +a/ä (rule for all old i-words)
Nominative Partitive Genetive Missä Plural Partitive
kausi kautta kauden kaudessa kausia
kuukausi kuukautta kuukauden kuukaudessa kuukausia
kuusi (6) kuutta kuuden kuudessa kuusia
käsi ttä den dessä käsiä
liesi liettä lieden liedessä liesiä
mesi mettä meden medessä mesiä
susi sutta suden sudessa susia
tosi totta toden todessa tosia
täysi täyttä täyden täydessä täysiä
uusi uutta uuden uudessa uusia
viisi viittä viiden viidessä viisiä

2.3. Old words ending in -li, -ni or -ri

This rule for words of two syllables ending in –li, -ni or –ri is not 100 % foolproof. There are words that end in –hi, like ”lohi” for example, that become ”lohta” in the partitive.

  • Partitive: remove –i and add –ta/-tä
  • Genetive: remove –i and add –en
  • Missä: remove –i and add –essa/-essä
  • Plural partitive: basic form +a/ä (rule for all old i-words)
Nominative Partitive Genetive Missä Plural Partitive
hiili hiil hiilen hiilessä hiiliä
hiiri hiir hiiren hiiressä hiiriä
huuli huulta huulen huulessa huulia
jousi jousta jousen jousessa jousia
juuri juurta juuren juuressa juuria
kieli kiel kielen kielessä kieliä
kuori kuorta kuoren kuoressa kuoria
kusi kusta kusen kusessa kusia
kuusi (spruce) kuusta kuusen kuusessa kuusia
lohi lohta lohen lohessa lohia
pieni pien pienen pienessä pieniä
saari saarta saaren saaressa saaria
sieni sien sienen sienessä sieniä
suoni suonta suonen suonessa suonia
suuri suurta suuren suuressa suuria
tuli tulta tulen tulessa tulia
tuuli tuulta tuulen tuulessa tuulia
vuori vuorta vuoren vuoressa vuoria
ääni ään äänen äänessä ääniä

2.4. Old words ending in -mi or -hi with two stems

Some words (eg. toimi) have two stems: a vowel stem (toime-a) and a consonant stem (toin-ta) for the singular partitive. Both of these forms are correct, but usually one of them is more common than the other.

The numbers mentioned are the number of results you get when googling these forms. This is not a 100% accurate representation of the reality, but gives you some idea nevertheless.

  • Partitive: either –ea/eä or –ta/tä (-nta/-ntä for -mi words)
  • Genetive: remove –i and add –en
  • Missä: remove –i and add –essa/-essä
  • Plural partitive: basic form +a/ä (rule for all old i-words)
Nominative Partitive #1 Partitive #2 Genetive Missä Plural Partitive
liemi niemeä – 1 300
lien– 138 000
liemen liemessä liemiä
luomi luomea – 9 000
luonta – 17 000
luoen luomessa luomia
riihi riiheä – 500
riih– 7 000
riihen riihessä riihiä
veitsi veitseä – 10 500
veis– 240 000
veitsen veitsessä veitsiä
vuohi vuohea– 1 800
vuohta – 28 000
vuohen vuohessa vuohiä
loimi loimea – 23 000
lointa – 27 000
loimen loimessa loimia
toimi toimea – 38 000
tointa – 62 000
toimen toimessa toimia
niemi niemeä – 31 000
nien– 4 000
niemen niemessä niemiä
taimi taimea – 85 000
tainta – 120 000
taimen taimessa taimia
tuomi tuomea – 11 000
tuonta – 3 000
tuomen tuomessa tuomia

In addition to the words above, it’s also interesting to mention kaali and viini. In some forms of Finnish slang, these words have an exceptional partitive form. Insteal of the regular kaalia and viiniä, some people use the alternative forms kaalta and viin. These are not considered correct, but they are interesting, because the exceptional form follows the regular rule for words ending in –li and –ni.

2.5. Exceptional words

The following words all have some kind of exceptional change going on. The exceptional thing has been marked in blue. For these words the battle is not between old versus new; they’re just exceptional forms, usually due to historical reasons.

Nominative Partitive Genetive Missä Plural Partitive
lapsi lasta lapsen lapsessa lapsia
yksi yh yhden yhdessä yksiä
kaksi kahta kahden kahdessä kaksia
varsi vartta varren varressa varsia
hirsi hirttä hirren hirressä hirsiä
kansi kantta kannen kanness kansia
meri merta meren meressä meriä
veri verta veren veressä veriä

Leave a Reply

avatar

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  Subscribe  
Notify of