Finnish for busy people

Ruoka Ruoat – Consonant Gradation where K disappears – KPT

One feature that confuses many learners of Finnish is related to the consonant -k- and how it “appears” or “disappears” in certain words. In this article, we’ll look at both nouns and verbs and how the -k- behaves in those.

The most common example is probably the word for “food”: ruoka, with its T-plural forms ruoat/ruuat, and inessive case form ruoassa/ruuassa. Check Wiktionary’s usage note for the variation.

1. What is consonant gradation?

Consonant gradation (astevaihtelu) is the phenomenon where a change will happen to the consonants at the edge of the last and the one-but-last syllable when you add an element to the end of the word. Consonant gradation also includes at least one of the consonants K, P and T, so in Finnish courses, it’s often referred to as KPT-vaihtelu.

These consonants are considered either “weak” or “strong”, for example, the -lt- in kulta is considered “strong” while the -ll- in kullat is considered “weak”. Consonant gradation only affects the consonants K, P and T (hence the term “KPT-vaihtelu” used in courses). Double -ss- will never become a single -s-.

2. What consonant gradation rules apply to the consonant k?

Here’s a list of consonant gradation pairs which include the consonant K:

Strong Weak Noun Example Verb Example
kk k pankki → pankissa nukkua → minä nukun
nk ng kaupunki → kaupungissa tinkiä → minä tingin
k Ø polku → polulla jakaa → minä jaan
k v luku → luvussa doesn’t exist
lk(i) lj(e) lki → jäljessä sulkea→ suljen
rk(i) rj(e) rki → järjellä rkeä → särjen

If you’re a beginner, your first question looking at this list is probably “how do I know which one of these changes applies?”. To answer this question, you need to look at the whole word in question: the surrounding letters will often give you a clue which consonant gradation change you are dealing with.

  • Words with a double –kk- never have any other pair than a single –k-.
  • Words with –nk- can only get –ng-.
  • Note that words like kinkku with -nkk– have -kk- gradation, not -nk- gradation!
  • Words with a single k that undergo consonant gradation normally get the k removed.
  • There are only 5 words that get a v: luku, puku, suku, kyky and myky.
  • Nouns that end in –rki or –lki will get –rj(e) and –lj(e) respectively (→ read more).
  • Verbs that end in –rkeä, –lkeä or -lkea will get rj(e) and lj(e) respectively (→ read more).
  • Note that nouns that end in -lkea (e.g. valkea) and -rkea (e.g. korkea) will not have consonant gradation.

In this article, the focus is on nouns and verbs where the K disappears!

3. Why does K disappear and appear?

The reason for the “disappearing” K lies in the history of the Finnish language. While in modern Finnish, K disappears, historically there was a weak consonant as a pair for the K, which in linguistic circles is marked as γ. You can read more about this voiced velar fricative on Wikipedia. Up until the 1500s, this sound was still present in some dialects, but it has since then disappeared completely.

So, K hasn’t always “just disappeared”. It has slowly faded out of the Finnish language, making it look like there was nothing there in the first place. However, this doesn’t really help you as a learner of Finnish. There is nothing left in words where the K disappears in the speech of modern Finnish.

One way to perhaps partly remember which verbs have a K is to look at the noun related to them. For example, the verb pelätä “to be afraid” becomes “minä pelkään“, similar to the noun pelko “fear”. In contrast, the verb pelata “to play” becomes “minä pelaan”, similar to the noun peli “game”. Early on, you might have learned the word makuuhuone “bedroom”. The makuu at the beginning of that noun is related to the verb maata (to lay down), for which the present tense conjugation is “minä makaan“.

Noun Genitive Verb SG1 present tense
pelko pelon pelätä pelkään
peli pelin pelata pelaan
makuu makuun maata makaan
alku alun alkaa alan
aie aikeen aikoa aion

4. Which forms are weak and which ones are strong?

Unfortunately, as you can see from the table above, the system becomes complicated when you add both wordtype A and B as well as all the verbtypes. They all have different rules for consonant gradation.

As such, the really important question becomes which forms are weak and which ones are strong? In order to address this issue, I’m giving you the rules one wordtype and one verbtype at a time below.

I would like to point out two websites that will prove useful when you’re inflecting nouns or conjugating verbs. Firstly, there’s Wiktionary! When searching for a word, for example alkaa, you can look at the declension table. Make sure to click “more” in the table to get the full view! I also really like Verbix, so click to look at alkaa in Verbix as well. Verbix – as the name implies – only shows you how verbs are conjugated, while in Wiktionary, you can also look at the inflection of nouns.

5. Nouns where the consonant K disappears

5.1. Wordtype A – Strong and weak forms

Based on their consonant gradation pattern, Finnish nouns can be divided into two groups. The first of these contains words where the basic form is strong, while some of the other cases will be weak. It’s common for teachers and coursebooks to refer to these words as “wordtype A” words (sanatyyppi A).

The table below contains the singular and plural inflection of the word alku. In red, you can see the forms where there is a -k- present.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative alku alut
Genitive alun alkujen
Partitive alkua alkuja
Inessive alussa aluissa
Elative alusta aluista
Illative alkuun alkuihin
Adessive alulla aluilla
Ablative alulta aluilta
Allative alulle aluille
Translative aluksi aluiksi
Essive alkuna alkuina

In the next table, I have organized the same information in a different format.

Basic Weak forms Strong forms
alku alun, alussa, alusta,
alulla, alulta, alulle,
aluksi, alut, aluissa,
aluista, aluilla, aluilta,
aluille, aluiksi
alkua, alkuun, alkuna,
alkuja, alkujen, alkuihin,
alkuina
arka aran, arassa, arasta,
aralla, aralta, aralle,
araksi, arat, aroissa,
aroista, aroilla, aroilta,
aroille, aroiksi
arkaa, arkaan, arkana,
arkoja, arkojen, arkoihin,
arkoina
haka haan, haassa, haasta,
haalla, haalta, haalle,
haaksi, haat, haoissa,
haoista, haoilla, haoilta,
haoille, haoiksi
hakaa, hakaan, hakana,
hakoja, hakojen, hakoihin,
hakoina

5.2. List of wordtype A words where K disappears

For each word, I’m providing you with 4 forms which are weak (the T-plural, genitive, inessive, plural inessive case forms) and 3 forms that are strong (partitive, illative and plural partitive). You can refer back to the table above to see the pattern for the rest of the cases. If you want to find out what the word means, you can click on the basic form of the word to be taken to Wiktionary and find the translation there! Wiktionary also provides you with the full inflection table when you click “more” where it says “declension”.

Basic T-plu. Gen. Iness. PL Iness Part. Illative PL Part.
alku alut alun alussa aluissa alkua alkuun alkuja
arka arat aran arassa aroissa arkaa arkaan arkoja
haka haat haan haassa haoissa hakaa hakaan hakoja
haku haut haun haussa hauissa hakua hakuun hakuja
halko halot halon halossa haloissa halkoa halkoon halkoja
hylky hylyt hylyn hylyssä hylyissä hylk hylkyyn hylkyjä
hyöky hyöyt hyöyn hyöyssä hyöyssä hyök hyökyyn hyökyjä
kä häät hään häässä häissä kää kään k
härkä härät härän härässä härissä härkää härkään härk
jako jaot jaon jaossa jaoissa jakoa jakoon jakoja
jalka jalat jalan jalassa jaloissa jalkaa jalkaan jalkoja
kaiku kaiut kaiun kaiussa kaiuissa kaikua kaikuun kaikuja
keko keot keon keossa keoissa kekoa kekoon kekoja
korko korot koron korossa koroissa korkoa korkoon korkoja
kulku kulut kulun kulussa kuluissa kulkua kulkuun kulkuja
laki lait lain laissa laeissa lakia lakiin lakeja
leuka leuat leuan leuassa leuoissa leukaa leukaan leukia
liika liiat liian liiassa liioissa liikaa liikaan liikoja
lika liat lian liassa lioissa likaa likaan likoja
loka loat loan loassa loissa lokaa lokaan lokia
maku maut maun maussa mauissa makua makuun makuja
märkä märät märän märässä märissä märkää märkään märk
mörkö möröt mörön mörössä möröissä mörköä mörköön mörköjä
ky näyt näyn näyssä näyissä k kyyn kyjä
kö näöt näön näössä näöissä köä köön köjä
nälkä nälät nälän nälässä nälissä nälkää nälkään nälk
olka olat olan olassa olissa olkaa olkaan olkia
pako paot paon paossa paoissa pakoa pakoon pakoja
parka parat paran parassa paroissa parkaa parkaan parkoja
pelko pelot pelon pelossa peloissa pelkoa pelkoon pelkoja
piika piiat piian piiassa piioissa piikaa piikaan piikoja
polku polut polun polussa poluissa polkua polkuun polkuja
rako raot raon raossa raoissa rakoa rakoon rakoja
ruoka ruoat ruoan ruoassa ruoissa ruokaa ruokaan ruokia
kä räät rään räässä räässä kää kään k
sarka sarat saran sarassa sarassa sarkaa sarkaan sarkia
selkä selät selän selässä selissä selkää selkään selk
siika siiat siian siiassa siioissa siikaa siikaan siikoja
sika siat sian siassa sioissa sikaa sikaan sikoja
suka suat suan suassa suissa sukaa sukaan sukia
sulka sulat sulan sulassa sulissa sulkaa sulkaan sulkia
sulku sulut sulun sulussa suluissa sulkua sulkuun sulkuja
särky säryt säryn säryssä säryissä särk särkyyn särkyjä
taika taiat taian taiassa taioissa taikaa taikaan taikoja
tauko tauot tauon tauossa tauoissa taukoa taukoon taukoja
teko teot teon teossa teoissa tekoa tekoon tekoja
velka velat velan velassa veloissa velkaa velkaan velkoja
vika viat vian viassa vioissa vikaa vikaan vikoja
virka virat viran virassa viroissa virkaa virkaan virkoja
vuoka vuoat vuoan vuoassa vuoissa vuokaa vuokaan vuokia

5.3. Some special words

# Basic T-plu. Gen. Iness. PL Iness Part. Illative PL Part.
1 ikä iät iän iässä i’issä ikää ikään ik
1 koko koot koon koossa ko’oissa kokoa kokoon kokoja
1 raaka raa’at raa’an raa’assa raaoissa raakaa raakaan raakoja
1 reikä reiät reiän reiässä rei’issä reikää reikään reik
1 ruoko ruo’ot ruo’on ruo’ossa ruo’oissa ruokoa ruokoon ruokoja
1 vaaka vaa’at vaa’an vaa’assa vaaoissa vaakaa vaakaan vaakoja
2 aika ajat ajan ajassa ajoissa aikaa aikaan aikoja
2 poika pojat pojan pojassa pojissa poikaa poikaan poikia
3 nahka nahat
nahkat
nahan
nahkan
nahassa
nahkassa
nahoissa
nahkoissa
nahkaa nahkaan nahkoja
3 uhka uhat
uhkat
uhan
uhkan
uhassa
uhkassa
uhissa
uhkissa
uhkaa uhkaan uhkia
4 paku pakut pakun pakussa pakuissa pakua pakuun pakuja
4 Aki  Akit Akin Akissa Akeissa Akia Akiin Akeja

Things of note about the table above:

  1. In situations where the disappearance of the -k- results in two of the same vowel becoming attached to one another, you will need to use an apostrophe in place of the -k-. This influences the pronunciation as well. I’issä (the plural -ssa form of ikä) will be pronounced differently than Iissä (the -ssa form of Ii, which is a municipality in Northern Finland).
  2. The words aika and poika have the -k- removed, but in addition the -i- is replaced with a -j-.
  3. Some words have two correct versions: one with the -k- intact and one without the -k-. In different dialects, people prefer one over the other. This is the case for the words nahka and uhka. The word tuhka also belongs to this group, but the versions where -k- disappears (tuhan, tuhkat) are much more uncommon than the version where -k- remains (tuhkan, tuhkat).
  4. Some words don’t have this type of consonant gradation: they retain their -k- in all forms. This is the case for:
    • Spoken language words: eg. paku, laku, eka, toka, säkä
    • Given names: Aki, Riku, Jyrki, Marko

5.4. Wordtype B – Strong and weak forms

Wordtype B has a completely different consonant gradation pattern than wordtype A. For one, the basic form of the word is weak (pyyhe rather than pyyhke). This can be explained by deep diving into the ancient history of how the Finnish language developed, but I will not go into that here. For most students, it is enough to just remember which forms will be weak and which forms will be strong. For wordtype B words, this means every form apart from the basic form and partitive case will be strong.

The table below contains the singular and plural inflection of the word koe. In red, you can see the forms where there is a -k- present.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative koe kokeet
Genitive kokeen kokeiden
Partitive koetta kokeita
Inessive kokeessa kokeissa
Elative kokeesta kokeista
Illative kokeeseen kokeisiin
Adessive kokeella kokeilla
Ablative kokeelta kokeilta
Allative kokeelle kokeille
Translative kokeeksi kokeiksi
Essive kokeena kokeina

In the next table, I have organized the same information in a different format.

Basic Weak forms Strong forms
koe koetta kokeen, kokeessa, kokeesta,
kokeeseen, kokeella, kokeelta,
kokeelle, kokeena, kokeeksi,
kokeet, kokeissa, kokeista,
kokeisiin, kokeilla, kokeilta,
kokeille, kokeina, kokeiksi
aie aietta aikeen, aikeessa, aikeesta,
aikeisiin, aikeella, aikeelta,
aikeelle, aikeena, aikeeksi,
aikeet, aikeissa, aikeista,
aikeisiin, aikeilla, aikeilta,
aikeille, aikeina, aikeiksi
jae jaetta jakeen, jakeessa, jakeesta,
jakeeseen, jakeella, jakeelta,
jakeelle, jakeena, jakeeksi,
jakeet, jakeissa, jakeista,
jakeisiin, jakeilla, jakeilta,
jakeille, jakeina, jakeiksi

5.5. List of wordtype B words where K disappears

For each word in the table below, I’m providing you with the nominative form and the partitive case (which are the only weak forms) and 6 forms which are strong (the T-plural, genitive, inessive, plural inessive case forms). You can refer back to the table above to see the pattern for the rest of the cases. If you want to find out what the word means, you can click on the basic form of the word to be taken to Wiktionary and find the translation there! Wiktionary also provides you with the full inflection table when you click “more” where it says “declension”.

Basic Part. T-plural Genitive Inessive Illative PL Part. PL Iness.
aie aietta aikeet aikeen aikeessa aikeeseen aikeita aikeissa
jae jaetta jakeet jakeen jakeessa jakeeseen jakeita jakeissa
koe koetta kokeet kokeen kokeessa kokeeseen kokeita kokeissa
pyyhe pyyhettä pyyhkeet pyyhkeen pyyhkeessä pyyhkeeseen pyyhkeitä pyyhkeissä
rae raetta rakeet rakeen rakeessa rakeeseen rakeita rakeissa
säe säettä keet keen keessä keeseen keitä keissä
säie säiettä säikeet säikeen säikeessä säikeeseen säikeitä säikeissä
tae taetta takeet takeen takeessa takeeseen takeita takeissa
ies iestä ikeet ikeen ikeessä ikeeseen ikeitä ikeissä
kiuas kiuasta kiukaat kiukaan kiukaassa kiukaaseen kiukaita kiukaissa
ruis ruista rukiit rukiin rukiissa rukiiseen rukiita rukiissa
varas varasta varkaat varkaan varkaassa varkaaseen varkaita varkaissa

6. Verbs where the consonant K disappears

6.1. Verbtype 1 – Strong and weak forms

The infinitive (basic form) of verbtype 1 verbs end in two vowels (e.g. alkaa, pukea). While I’ve added the most common conjugated forms in the lists below, you might also want to take a look at the full conjugation table on Verbix. Here’s a link for the verb pukea.

Strong forms for verbtype 1:

  • the infinitive (pukea)
  • the present tense hän-form (pukee) and he-form (pukevat)
  • the past tense (imperfect) hän-form (puki) and he-form (pukivat)
  • all the active conditional forms, both affirmative and negative (pukisin, pukisit, pukisi, pukisimme, pukisitte, pukisivat, en pukisi)
  • all the potential forms (pukenen, pukenet, pukenee, pukenemme, pukenette, pukenevat)
  • the third and fourth infinitive forms (pukemassa, pukemasta, pukemaan, pukematta, pukeminen)
  • the NUT-participle (pukenut, pukeneet)
  • the imperative forms (pukekaa, pukekoon, pukekoot), except for the second person singular (pue!)

Weak forms for verbtype 1:

  • the present tense minä, sinä, me, and te forms (puen, puet, puemme, puette)
  • the negative present tense (en pue, et pue, ei pue)
  • the past tense (imperfect) minä, sinä, me and te form (puin, puit, puimme, puitte)
  • the passive present tense (puetaan, ei pueta)
  • the passive imperfect (puettiin, ei puettu)
  • the passive conditional (puettaisiin, ei puettaisi)
  • the passive TAVA– and TU-participles (puettava, puettu)

The table below contains the minä, sinä and hän forms of the present tense, imperfect and conditional, as well as the negative forms of each of these. The verb in question is alkaa. In red, you can see the forms where there is a -k- present.

SG1 SG2 SG3 Passive
Present alan alat alkaa aletaan
Negative en ala et ala ei ala ei aleta
Imperfect aloin aloit alkoi alettiin
Negative en alkanut et alkanut ei alkanut ei alettu
Conditional alkaisin alkaisit alkaisi alettaisiin
Negative en alkaisi et alkaisi ei alkaisi ei alettaisi

In the next table, I have organized similar information in a different format.

Basic Weak forms Strong forms
alkaa alan, alat, alamme,
alatte, en ala, et ala,
emme ala, ette ala,
aloin, aloit, aloimme,
aloitte, aletaan,
alettiin, alettaisiin,
ei aleta, ei alettu,
ei alettaisi
alkaa, alkavat,
alkanut, alkaneet
alkaisin, alkaisit,
alkaisi, en alkaisi,
et alkaisi, ei alkaisi,
alkaisimme, alkaisitte,
alkaisivat,
emme alkaisi,
ette alkaisi,
eivät alkaisi

6.2. List of verbtype 1 verbs where K disappears

In the table below, I’m providing you with the following forms:

  • Basic: the infinitive for the verb, which is always strong
  • SG1: the positive minä-form of the present tense. In addition to minä, also sinä, me and te are weak (aion, aiot, aiomme, aiotte)
  • SG3 Neg: the negative hän-form of the present tense
  • PL2 Imp: the te-form of the imperfect tense
  • Pres Pass: the present passive form
  • SG3 Pr: the hän-form of the present tense. In addition to hän, the plural form he is also strong.
  • SG3 Imp: the hän-form of the imperfect tense. In addition to hän, the plural form he is also strong.
  • NUT: the NUT-partisiippi ie. the active past participle.
Basic SG1 SG3 Neg PL2 Imp Pres Pass SG3 Pr SG3 Imp NUT
aikoa aion ei aio aioitte aiotaan aikoo aikoi aikonut
alkaa alan ei ala aloitte aletaan alkaa alkoi alkanut
hakea haen ei hae haitte haetaan hakee haki hakenut
hakoa haon ei hao haoitte haotaan hakoo hakoi hakonut
halkoa halon ei halo haloitte halotaan halkoo halkoi halkonut
hokea hoen ei hoe hoitte hoetaan hokee hoki hokenut
huokua huoun ei huou huouitte huoutaan huokuu huokui huokunut
hyök hyöyn ei hyöy hyöyitte hyöytään hyökyy hyökyi hyökynyt
jakaa jaan ei jaa jaoitte jaetaan jakaa jakoi jakanut
kaikua kaiun ei kaiu kaiuitte kaiutaan kaikuu kaikui kaikunut
kakoa kaon ei kao kaoitte kaotaan kakoo kakoi kakonut
kirkua kirun ei kiru kiruitte kirutaan kirkuu kirkui kirkunut
kokea koen ei koe koitte koetaan kokee koki kokenut
laukoa lauon ei lauo lauoitte lauotaan laukoo laukoi laukonut
liukua liu’un ei liu’u liu’uitte liutuaan liukuu liukui liukunut
lukea luen ei lue luitte luetaan lukee luki lukenut
maukua mau’un ei mau’u mau’uitte mau’utaan maukuu maukui maukunut
naukua nau’un ei nau’u nau’uitte nau’utaan naukuu naukui naukunut
k näyn ei näy näyitte näytään kyy kyi kynyt
oikoa oion ei oio oioitte oiotaan oikoo oikoi oikonut
parkua parun ei paru paruitte parutaan parkuu parkui parkunut
pukea puen ei pue puitte puetaan pukee puki pukenut
purkaa puran ei pura puritte puretaan purkaa purki purkanut
raikua raiun ei raiu raiuitte raiutaan raikuu raikui raikunut
rääk rääyn ei rääy rääyitte rääytään rääkyy rääkyi rääkynyt
särk säryn ei säry säryitte särytään särkyy särkyi särkynyt
taikoa taion ei taio taioitte taiotaan taikoo taikoi taikonut
takoa taon ei tao taoitte taotaan takoo takoi takonut
tukea tuen ei tue tuitte tuetaan tukee tuki tukenut

6.3. Verbtype 2 – tehdä and nähdä

Out of all the verbtype 2 forms that exist, only the verbs tehdä and nähdä have consonant gradation. The active present and imperfect tenses, as well as the conditional and the singular imperative, match up perfectly with the strong and weak forms of verbtype 1. Some other forms, however, have an -h- rather than a -k-. This is true for the infinitive (tehdä, nähdä), certain imperative forms (tehkää, tehköön, tehkööt) and the past passives (tehnyt, tehty).

Strong forms for tehdä and nähdä:

  • the present tense hän-form (tekee) and he-form (tekevät)
  • the past tense (imperfect) hän-form (teki) and he-form (tekivät)
  • all the active conditional forms, both affirmative and negative (tekisin, tekisit, tekisi, tekisimme, tekisitte, tekisivät, en tekisi)
  • the third and fourth infinitive forms (tekemässä, tekemästä, tekemään, tekemättä, tekeminen)

Weak forms for tehdä and nähdä:

  • the present tense minä, sinä, me, and te forms (teen, teet, teemme, teette)
  • the negative present tense (en tee, et tee, ei tee)
  • the past tense (imperfect) minä, sinä, me and te form (tein, teit, teimme, teitte)

Forms with an -h- for tehdä and nähdä:

The table below contains an overview of the most common conjugated forms of the verbs tehdä and nähdä. In red, you can see the forms where there is a -k- present.

Basic Weak forms Strong forms
tehdä teen, teet, teemme, teette,
en tee, et tee, ei tee,
emme tee, ette tee,
eivät tee, tein, teit,
teimme, teitte
tekee, tekevät, teki, tekivät,
tekisin, tekisit, tekisi,
tekisimme, tekisitte,
tekisivät, en tekisi, et tekisi,
ei tekisi, emme tekisi,
ette tekisi, eivät tekisi,
tekemään, tekeminen
nähdä näen, näet, näemme, näette,
en näe, et näe, ei näe,
emme näe, ette näe,
eivät näe, näin, näit,
näimme, näitte
kee, näkevät, näki, näkivät
kisin, näkisit, näkisi,
kisimme, näkisitte,
kisivät, en näkisi, et näkisi,
ei näkisi, emme näkisi,
ette näkisi, eivät näkisi,
kemään, näkeminen

6.4. Verbtype 3 – Strong and weak forms

There are only a couple of verbtype 3 verbs that have a -k- that disappears: jaella, juosta, piestä and syöstä.

Strong forms for verbtype 3:

  • all the present tense forms (jakelen, jakelet, jakelee, jakelemme, jakelette, jakelevat)
  • all the negative present tense forms (en jakele, et jakele, ei jakele)
  • all the past tense (imperfect) forms (jakelin, jakelit, jakeli, jakelimme, jakelitte, jakelivat)
  • all the active conditional forms (jakelisin, jakelisit, jakelisi, jakelisimme, jakelisitte, jakelisivat)
  • the third and fourth infinitive forms (jakelemassa, jakelemsta, jakelemaan, jakelematta, jakeleminen)
  • the imperative‘s second person singular (jakele)

Weak forms for verbtype 3:

The table below contains the minä, sinä and hän forms of the present tense, imperfect and conditional, as well as the negative forms of each of these. The verb in question is jaella. In red, you can see the forms where there is a -k- present.

SG1 SG2 SG3 Passive
Present jakelen jakelet jakelee jaellaan
Negative en jakele et jakele ei jakele ei jaella
Imperfect jakelin jakelit jakeli jaeltiin
Negative en jaellut et jaellut ei jaellut ei jaeltu
Conditional jakelisin jakelisit jakelisi jaeltaisiin
Negative en jakelisi et jakelisi ei jakelisi ei jaeltaisi

In the next table, I have organized similar information in a different format.

Basic Weak forms Strong forms
juosta en juossut, et juossut, ei juossut etc.
juostaan, ei juosta,
juostiin, ei juostu,
juostaisiin, ei juostaisi,
juossut, juostava, juostu,
juoskaa, juoskoon, juoskoot
juoksen, juokset, juokse, etc.
en juokse, et juokse, ei juokse, etc.
juoksin, juoksit, juoksi, etc.
juoksisin, juoksisit, juoksisi, etc.
en juoksisi, et juoksisi, ei juoksisi, etc.
juokseva, juokse!

6.5. List of verbtype 3 verbs where K disappears

In the table below, I’m providing you with the following forms:

  • Basic: the infinitive for the verb, which is always weak in verbtype 3
  • Passive: the present passive. The negative forms of the present passive are also weak.
  • NUT: the NUT-partisiippi ie. the active past participle.
  • SG1: the positive minä-form of the present tense. In addition to minä, all the other persons are also strong in verbtype 3 (juoksen, juokset, juoksee, juoksemme, juoksette, juoksevat).
  • SG3 Neg: the negative hän-form of the present tense. All the other negative present tense forms are also strong in verbtype 3 (en juokse, et juokse, emme juokse, ette juokse, eivät juokse).
  • PL1 Imp: the me-form of the imperfect (past) tense. All the other active imperfect forms are also strong in verbtype 3 (juoksin, juoksit, juoksi, juoksitte, juoksivat).
  • SG3 Cond: the third person singular conditional form. All the other persons are also strong in verbtype 3 (juoksisin, juoksisit, juoksisimme, juoksisitte, juoksisivat).
Basic Passive NUT SG1 SG3 Neg PL1 Imp SG3 Cond
jaella jaellaan jaellut jakelen ei jakele jakelimme jakelisi
juosta juostaan juossut juoksen ei juokse juoksimme juoksisi
piestä piestään piessyt pieksen ei piekse pieksimme pieksisi
syöstä syöstään syössyt syöksen ei syökse syöksimme syöksisi

6.6. Verbtype 4 – Strong and weak forms

The infinitive (basic form) of verbtype 4 verbs is weak (e.g. tavata, maata). While I’ve added the most common conjugated forms in the lists below, you might also want to take a look at the full conjugation table on Verbix. Here’s a link for the verb tavata.

Strong forms for verbtype 4:

  • all the present tense forms (pelkään, pelkäät, pelkää, pelkäämme, pelkäätte, pelkäävät)
  • all the negative present tense forms (en pelkää, et pelkää, ei pelkää, emme pelkää, ette pelkää, eivät pelkää)
  • all the past tense (imperfect) forms (pelkäsin, pelkäsit, pelkäsi, pelkäsimme, pelkäsitte, pelkäsivät)
  • all the active conditional forms (pelkäisin, pelkäisit, pelkäisi, pelkäisimme, pelkäisitte, pelkäisivät)
  • all the negative conditional forms (en pelkäisi, et pelkäisi, ei pelkäisi, emme pelkäisi, ette pelkäisi, eivät pelkäisi)
  • the third and fourth infinitive forms (pelkäämässä, pelkäämästä, pelkäämään, pelkäämättä, pelkääminen)
  • the imperative‘s second person singular (pelkää)

Weak forms for verbtype 4:

The table below contains the minä, sinä and hän forms of the present tense, imperfect and conditional, as well as the negative forms of each of these. The verb in question is pelätä. In red, you can see the forms where there is a -k- present.

SG1 SG2 SG3 Passive
Present pelkään pelkäät pelkää pelätään
Negative en pelkää et pelkää ei pelkää ei pelätä
Imperfect pelkäsin pelkäsit pelkäsi pelättiin
Negative en pelännyt et pelännyt ei pelännyt ei pelätty
Conditional pelkäisin pelkäisit pelkäisi pelättäisiin
Negative en pelkäisi et pelkäisi ei pelkäisi ei pelättäisi

In the next table, I have organized similar information in a different format.

Basic Weak forms Strong forms
pelätä en pelännyt, et pelännyt, ei pelännyt, etc.
pelätään, ei pelätä,
pelättiin, ei pelätty,
pelättäisiin, ei pelättäisi,
pelännyt, pelättävä, pelätty,
pelätkää, pelätköön, pelätkööt
pelkään, pelkäät, pelkää, etc.
en pelkää, et pelkää, ei pelkää, etc.
pelkäsin, pelkäsit, pelkäsi, etc.
pelkäisin, pelkäisit, pelkäisi, etc.
en pelkäisi, et pelkäisi, ei pelkäisi, etc.
pelkäävä, pelkää!

6.7. List of verbtype 4 verbs where K disappears

In the table below, I’m providing you with the following forms:

  • Basic: the infinitive for the verb, which is always weak in verbtype 4
  • Passive: the present passive. The negative forms of the present passive are also weak.
  • NUT: the NUT-partisiippi ie. the active past participle.
  • SG1: the positive minä-form of the present tense. In addition to minä, all the other persons are also strong in verbtype 4 (pelkäät, pelkää, pelkäämme, pelkäätte, pelkäävät).
  • SG3 neg: the negative hän-form of the present tense. All the other negative present tense forms are also strong in verbtype 4 (en pelkää, et pelkää, emme pelkää, ette pelkää, eivät pelkää).
  • PL1 Imp: the me-form of the imperfect (past) tense. All the other active imperfect forms are also strong in verbtype 4 (pelkäsin, pelkäsit, pelkäsi, pelkäsitte, pelkäsivät).
  • SG3 Cond: the third person singular conditional form. All the other persons are also strong in verbtype 4 (pelkäisin, pelkäisit, pelkäisimme, pelkäisitte, pelkäisivät).
Basic Passive NUT SG1 SG3 neg PL1 Imp SG3 Cond
aueta auetaan auennut aukeaa ei aukea aukesimme aukeaisi
huoata huoataan huoannut huokaan ei huokaa huokasimme huokaisi
hylätä hylätään hylännyt hylkään ei hylkää hylkäsimme hylkäisi
karata karataan karannut karkaan ei karkaa karkasimme karkaisi
liata liataan liannut likaan ei likaa likasimme likaisi
loata loataan loannut lokaan ei lokaa lokasimme lokaisi
maata maataan maannut makaan ei makaa makasimme makaisi
pelätä pelätään pelännyt pelkään ei pelkää pelkäsimme pelkäisi
perata perataan perannut perkaan ei perkaa perkasimme perkaisi
taata taataan taannut takaan ei takaa takasimme takaisi
uhata uhataan uhannut uhkaan ei uhkaa uhkasimme uhkaisi
vaata vaataan vaannut vakaan ei vakaa vakasimme vakaisi

6.8. Verbtype 5 – Strong and weak forms

The infinitive (basic form) of verbtype 5 verbs is weak (e.g. paeta, oieta). While I’ve added the most common conjugated forms in the lists below, you might also want to take a look at the full conjugation table on Verbix. Here’s a link for the verb paeta.

Strong forms for verbtype 5:

  • all the present tense forms (pakenen, pakenet, pakenee, pakenemme, pakenette, pakenevat)
  • all the negative present tense forms (en pakene, et pakene, ei pakene, emme pakene, ette pakene, eivät pakene)
  • all the past tense (imperfect) forms (pakenin, pakenit, pakeni, pakenimme, pakenitte, pakenivat)
  • all the active conditional forms (pakenisin, pakenisit, pakenisi, pakenisimme, pakenisitte, pakenisivat)
  • all the negative conditional forms (en pakenisi, et pakenisi, ei pakenisi, emme pakenisi, ette pakenisi, eivät pakenisi)
  • the third and fourth infinitive forms (pakenemaan, pakenemassa, pakenemasta, pakenematta, pakeneminen)
  • the imperative‘s second person singular (pakene)

Weak forms for verbtype 4:

The table below contains the minä, sinä and hän forms of the present tense, imperfect and conditional, as well as the negative forms of each of these. The verb in question is paeta. In red, you can see the forms where there is a -k- present.

SG1 SG2 SG3 Passive
Present pakenen pakenet pakenee paetaan
Negative en pakene et pakene et pakene ei paeta
Imperfect pakenin pakenit pakeni paettiin
Negative en paennut et paennut ei paennut ei paettu
Conditional pakenisin pakenisit pakenisi paettaisiin
Negative en pakenisi et pakenisi ei pakenisi ei paettaisi

In the next table, I have organized similar information in a different format.

Basic Weak forms Strong forms
paeta en paennut, et paennut, ei paennut, etc.
paetaan, ei paeta,
paettiin, ei paettu,
paettaisiin, ei paettaisi,
paennut, paettava, paettu,
paetkaa, paetkoon, paetkoot
pakenen, pakenet, pakenee, etc.
en pakene, et pakene, ei pakene, etc.
pakenin, pakenit, pakeni, etc.
pakenisin, pakenisit, pakenisi, etc.
en pakenisi, et pakenisi, ei pakenisi etc.
pakeneva, pakene!

6.9. List of verbtype 5 verbs where K disappears

In the table below, I’m providing you with the following forms:

  • Basic: the infinitive for the verb, which is always weak in verbtype 5
  • Passive: the present passive. The negative forms of the present passive are also weak.
  • NUT: the NUT-partisiippi ie. the active past participle.
  • SG1: the positive minä-form of the present tense. In addition to minä, all the other persons are also strong in verbtype 5 (pakenet, pakenee, pakenemme, pakenette, pakenevat).
  • SG3 Neg: the negative hän-form of the present tense. All the other negative present tense forms are also strong in verbtype 5 (en pakene, et pakene, emme pakene, ette pakene, eivät pakene).
  • PL1 Imp: the me-form of the imperfect (past) tense. All the other active imperfect forms are also strong in verbtype 5 (pakenin, pakenit, pakeni, pakenitte, pakenivat).
  • SG3 Cond: the third person singular conditional form. All the other persons are also strong in verbtype 5 (pakenisin, pakenisit, pakenisimme, pakenisitte, pakenisivat).
Basic Passive NUT SG1 SG3 Neg PL1 Imp SG3 Cond
kyetä kyetään kyennyt kykenen ei kykene kykenimme kykenisi
liietä liietään liiennyt liikenen ei liikene liikenimme liikenisi
liueta liuetaan liuennut liukenen ei liukene liukenimme liukenisi
oieta oietaan oiennut oikenen ei oikene oikenimme oikenisi
paeta paetaan paennut pakenen ei pakene pakenimme pakenisi
saeta saetaan saennut sakenen ei sakene sakenimme sakenisi
toeta toetaan toennut tokenen ei tokene tokenimme tokenisi
vaieta vaietaan vaiennut vaikenen ei vaikene vaikenimme vaikenisi

That’s all for this article! I hope my tables and lists help you. I’m aware this page is somewhat chaotic, but it’s a complex issue, difficult to lay out comprehensively!

0 0 votes
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

2 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Andrei Eremin

Thank you for explaining this annoying disappearing “k” me and my wife was always fighting with.
Just wanted to point out, that verbix can also do finnish noun declensions https://www.verbix.com/languages/finnish-nouns

Inge (admin)

Oh, thanks for letting me know about Verbix! 😀