Necessity Sentences – Täytyy – Pitää – On Pakko

Necessity sentences express that something must be done. It can be used in affirmative sentences, but also as an order. In the case with orders, they’re often interchangeable with the imperative.

Table of Contents
  1. Ways to Express Necessity
  2. The Formation of Necessity Sentences
    1. Affirmative necessity and orders
    2. Negative necessity and orders
      1. General rule
      2. Other option
  3. The Object of a Necessity Sentence
    1. Affirmative sentences
  4. Spoken language

1. Ways to Express Necessity

When you want to say you have to do something or must do something, you have to use a special sentence construction in Finnish. There are several verbs to express necessity. They all have in common that they require the subject to be inflected in the partitive, but vary in their intensity.

Finnish English Notes
Sinun täytyy lähteä. You have to leave. Täytyy and pitää are interchangeable.
Sinun pitää lähteä. You have to leave. Täytyy and pitää are interchangeable.
Sinun on lähdettävä. You have to leave. A little stronger than täytyy. Mainly written.
Sinun tulee lähteä. You have to leave. Mainly in official written contexts.
Sinun on pakko lähteä. You’re forced to leave. Stronger than all the previous.
Sinun kannattaa lähteä. You should leave. More of a suggestion than an order.
Sinun pitänee lähteä. You probably should leave. Same as previous, with the potential.
Sinun olisi hyvä lähteä. It would be good for you to leave. Suggestion.

2. The Formation of Necessity Sentences

2.1. Affirmative necessity and orders

All the ways of expressing necessity you can see in the table above will require their subject to be inflected in the genetive case.

Genitive + täytyy + infinitive
Genitive + pitää + infinitive
Genitive + on pakko + infinitive

The verb of the sentence (täytyy, pitää, on pakko, etc.) will not be conjugated. The second verb, the one that expresses what you are required to do, will always appear in its infinitive form.

Finnish English
Minun täytyy jäädä ylitöihin tänään. I have to stay and work overtime today.
Sinun täytyy lukea monta tenttikirjaa. You have to read many exam books.
Hänen täytyy lähteä työmatkalle Kiinaan. She has to go to China on a work trip.
Meidän täytyy tehdä lumitöitä pihalla. We have to shovel the snow in the yard.
Teidän täytyy muistaa soittaa hammaslääkärille. You have to remember to call the dentist.
Heidän täytyy ostaa limsaa juhliin. They have to buy soda for the party.
Lyhyen naisen täytyy käyttää korkkareita. The short woman has to use high heels.
Miesten täytyy ostaa ruusuja vaimoilleen. The men have to buy roses for their wives.

2.2. Negative necessity and orders

2.2.1 General rule

Just like in affirmative sentences, the necessity verb (täytyy, kannattaa) will stay the same in every person; you don’t conjugate the verb. Notice that regardless of the verb used in the affirmative sentence, the negative version will always have “ei tarvitse”!

Genitive + ei tarvitse + infinitive
Genitive + ei ole pakko + infinitive 

Affirmative Negative
Minun täytyy jäädä ylitöihin tänään. Minun ei tarvitse jäädä ylitöihin tänään.
Sinun pitää lukea monta tenttikirjaa. Sinun ei tarvitse lukea monta tenttikirjaa.
Hänen on pakko lähteä työmatkalle Kiinaan.
Hänen ei tarvitse lähteä työmatkalle Kiinaan.
Meidän kannattaa tehdä lumitöitä pihalla. Meidän ei tarvitse tehdä lumitöitä pihalla.
Teidän täytyy muistaa soittaa hammaslääkärille. Teidän ei tarvitse muistaa soittaa hammaslääkärille.
Heidän pitää ostaa limsaa juhliin. Heidän ei tarvitse ostaa limsaa juhliin.
Lyhyen naisen on pakko käyttää korkkareita. Lyhyen naisen ei tarvitse käyttää korkkareita.
Miesten kannattaa ostaa ruusuja vaimoilleen. Miesten ei tarvitse ostaa ruusuja vaimoilleen.

2.2.2. Other option

While in the table above, we replaced every necessity verb by “ei tarvitse”, this is not always necessary. For example “on pakki” and “kannattaa” can definitely be conjugated in the negative third person.

You should be more careful with “ei täydy” and “ei pidä”. While these forms are possible, they’re rarely used at all. You’re better off sticking to “ei tarvitse” with täytyy and pitää.

Affirmative Negative
Hänen on pakko lähteä työmatkalle Kiinaan. Hänen ei ole pakko lähteä työmatkalle Kiinaan.
Meidän kannattaa tehdä lumitöitä pihalla. Meidän ei kannata tehdä lumitöitä pihalla.

3. The Object of a Necessity Sentence

3.1. Affirmative Sentences

The genetive object of an affirmative sentence will be in its basic form (the nomative). Objects can also appear in the partitive. When using a necessity sentence construction, these objects will remain in the partitive (see the last example in the table below).

Object Sentence Necessity Sentence
Hän ostaa uuden takin. Hänen täytyy ostaa uusi takki.
Me tarvitsemme isomman asunnon. Meidän täytyy löytää isompi asunto.
Anna haluaa syödä omenan. Annan on pakko syödä omena.
Miehet avaavat ikkunan. Miesten pitää avata ikkuna.
Opettaja juo olutta. Opettajan täytyy juoda olutta.

3.2. Negative Sentences

A negative sentence with an object will always require the partitive case.

Affirmative Negative
Hänen täytyy ostaa uusi takki. Hänen ei tarvitseostaa uutta takkia.
Meidän täytyy löytää isompi asunto. Meidän ei tarvitse löytää isompaa asuntoa.
Annan on pakko syödä omena. Annan ei ole pakko syödä omenaa.
Miesten pitää avata ikkuna. Miesten ei tarvitse avata ikkunaa.
Opettajan täytyy juoda olutta. Opettajan ei tarvitse juoda olutta.

 

4. Spoken Language

In spoken language there are several variations when it comes to the verb of the sentence. Instead of “minun täytyy” it is possible to say “mun täytyy” or “mun tarttee“.

“Minun ei tarvitse” could also be “mun ei tarvitse“, “mun ei tarvii“, “mun ei tarvi” or “mun ei tartte” depending on the dialect of the person speaking.

2
Leave a Reply

avatar
1 Comment threads
1 Thread replies
0 Followers
 
Most reacted comment
Hottest comment thread
2 Comment authors
Inge (admin)Aleksandr Recent comment authors

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
aleksandr
Guest
aleksandr

In the first table here “Ways to Express Necessity”:
“Sinun tulee lähteä.” – “I have to leave.” I guess it should be “you” instead of “I”?

Inge (admin)
Guest
Inge (admin)

Thanks! 🙂