Finnish for busy people

Making Verbs Negative in Finnish – Don’t Haven’t Hadn’t Shouldn’t

In Finnish, making verbs negative requires the negative verb ei. That’s how you express that you don’t, didn’t, won’t, wouldn’t, shouldn’t or can’t do something. You make verbs negative by adding ei to the sentence, in front of the main verb. You can consider ei a “verb” in Finnish because it gets conjugated like verbs do: minä en, sinä et, hän ei, me emme, te ette, he eivät.

When making a verb (eg. puhua) negative, your main verb won’t get the personal ending of an affirmative sentence (puhun, puhut, puhumme). Instead, the personal ending will appear on the negative verb (en puhu, et puhu, emme puhu).

You should have at least a basic understanding of the conjugation of verbs before reading this article. Knowing the Finnish verbtypes will help with that.

Please note!

This article is certain to overwhelm you, no matter what level you are at. It contains some very rare forms. Just like most things on my website, this article is meant as an overview. You can pick up certain tendencies from this article, but I would advise against systematically learning each and every negative form as they are listed here.

ACTIVE FORMS

1. Negative Present Tense

The present tense expresses what’s happening (or isn’t happening) right now. In Finnish, the present tense is also used to express actions in the future.

Positive Negative Meaning
minä puhun minä en puhu I don’t speak
sinä puhut sinä et puhu you (singular) don’t speak
hän puhuu hän ei puhu he/she doesn’t speak
me puhumme me emme puhu we don’t speak
te puhutte te ette puhu you (plural) don’t speak
he puhuvat he eivät puhu they don’t speak

For the present tense, you will use the minä-form as the base for the negative. This is an easy step to get the right stem for the negative conjugation. The negative of all verbtypes looks the same as the minä-form minus the -n :

  • lukea : minä luen : me emme lue, he eivät lue
  • tarvita : minä tarvitsen : minä en tarvitse, hän ei tarvitse

Another reason why it’s convenient to start from the minä-form is consonant gradation. Certain verbtypes are weak and others are strong in the negative. The minä-form will have the same grade as the negative:

  • Tietää becomes tiedän in the minä-form, so the negative becomes “ei tiedä”.
  • Tavata becomes tapaan in the minä-form, so the negative becomes “ei tapaa”.

Negative Present Tense Examples

The following table displays verbs in both the affirmative and the negative present tense. The displayed affirmative form is always the minä-form because that’s the form that will most easily lead you to the negative form.

For the negative, I’ve conjugated the verb in a random person. You can see how the negative verb (ei) gets conjugated (eg. en, emme, eivät), while the main verb looks the same as the minä-form minus the -n. The green -n is the letter you remove to find the correct form for the negative conjugation.

The column labeled VT contains the number of the verbtype the verb in question belongs to.

VT Verb Positive Negative Meaning
1 kysyä minä kysy|n minä en kysy I don’t ask
1 nukkua minä nuku|n sinä et nuku you (singular) don’t sleep
2 juoda minä juo|n hän ei juo he/she doesn’t drink
2 syödä minä syö|n me emme syö we don’t eat
3 opiskella minä opiskele|n te ette opiskele you (plural) don’t study
3 mennä minä mene|n hän ei mene he/she doesn’t go
3 ajatella minä ajattele|n minä en ajattele I don’t think
4 tavata minä tapaa|n me emme tapaa we don’t meet
4 siivota minä siivoa|n minä en siivoa I don’t clean
5 tarvita minä tarvitse|n te ette tarvitse you (plural) don’t need
5 valita minä valitse|n sinä et valitse you (singular) don’t choose
6 paeta minä pakene|n he eivät pakene they don’t escape
6 lämmetä minä lämpene|n se ei lämpene it doesn’t get warmer

Note: If you’re currently in a beginner Finnish course or using a beginner course book, you won’t have learned about verbtype 6 yet. It’s a rare verbtype that usually only gets discussed in intermediate or advanced courses. I’m including it here to be complete. It’s included on my overview page of the verbtypes.

Back to top

2. Negative Imperfect Tense

The sentence “Minä en tullut, koska en muistanut tapaamista” contains two examples of the negative imperfect tense. The sentence means “I didn’t come because I didn’t remember the meeting”.

The negative past tense (negative imperfect) is formed by conjugating the negative verb ei (eg. en, emme) in combination with the NUT-participle (eg. puhunut, valinnut). It often looks very different from the affirmative imperfect (eg. minä nauroin vs. minä en nauranut).

  • In the singular forms minä, sinä and hän the verb gets -nut or -nyt (vowel harmony).
  • In the plural forms me, te and he you will have -neet.
Finnish English
minä en puhunut I didn’t speak
sinä et puhunut you (singular) didn’t speak
hän ei puhunut he didn’t speak
me emme puhuneet we didn’t speak
te ette puhuneet you (plural) didn’t speak
he eivät puhuneet they didn’t speak

I have a separate article about the negative imperfect that goes into more detail.

Negative Past Tense Examples

The following table displays some example verbs in both a random singular form (minä, sinä or hän) and in a random plural form (me, te or he). It demonstrates the variation in verbtype 3, 4, 5 and 6, which don’t get -nut/-nyt:

  • Verbtype 3: double the consonant that’s left after removing the final two letters of the infinitive.
  • Verbtypes 4, 5 and 6: add -nnut/-nnyt after removing the -ta/tä from the end of the infinitive.

The number in the column labeled VT is the verbtype of the verb in question. Some letters have been highlighted in green to show their deviation from the general -nut/-nyt/-neet ending.

VT Verb Singular example Plural example
1 kysy|ä minä en kysynyt me emme kysyneet
1 nukku|a minä en nukkunut te ette nukkuneet
2 juo|da hän ei juonut te ette juoneet
2 syö|dä sinä et syönyt he eivät syöneet
3 opiskel|la minä en opiskellut he eivät opiskelleet
3 pur|ra sinä et purrut me emme purreet
3 pes|tä hän ei pessyt te ette pesseet
4 tava|ta minä en tavannut he eivät tavanneet
4 siivo|ta sinä et siivonnut te ette siivonneet
5 tarvi|ta hän ei tarvinnut he eivät tarvinneet
5 vali|ta sinä et valinnut te ette valinneet
6 pae|ta minä en paennut me emme paenneet
6 lämme|tä se ei lämmennyt ne eivät lämmenneet

3. Negative Perfect Tense

The sentence “Minä en ole nähnyt häntä kymmeneen vuoteen” contains an example of the negative perfect tense. The sentence means “I haven’t seen him/her in ten years”.

The perfect tense always consists of two elements: the verb olla and the NUT-participle of the main verb (eg. olen asunut, olemme menneet). When making the perfect tense negative, you will use the negative verb ei combined with the negative form of the verb olla: ole. The NUT-participle remains the same.

  • In the singular forms minä, sinä and hän the verb gets -nut or -nyt (vowel harmony).
  • In the plural forms me, te and he you will have -neet.
Affirmative Negative English
minä olen puhunut minä en ole puhunut I haven’t spoken
sinä olet puhunut sinä et ole puhunut you haven’t spoken
hän on puhunut hän ei ole puhunut he/she hasn’t spoken
me olemme puhuneet me emme ole puhuneet we haven’t spoken
te olette puhuneet te ette ole puhuneet you (plural) haven’t spoken
he ovat puhuneet he eivät ole puhuneet they haven’t spoken

Negative Perfect Tense Examples

The following table displays certain verbs in both a random singular form (minä, sinä or hän) and a random plural form (me, te or he). The number in the column labeled VT is the verbtype of the verb in question. Some letters have been highlighted in green to show their deviation from the general -nut/-nyt/-neet ending.

VT Verb Singular example Plural example
1 kysy|ä minä en ole kysynyt me emme ole kysyneet
1 nukku|a minä en ole nukkunut te ette ole nukkuneet
2 juo|da hän ei ole juonut te ette ole juoneet
2 syö|dä sinä et ole syönyt he eivät ole syöneet
3 opiskel|la minä en ole opiskellut he eivät ole opiskelleet
3 pur|ra sinä et ole purrut me emme ole purreet
3 pes|tä hän ei ole pessyt te ette ole pesseet
4 tava|ta minä en ole tavannut he eivät ole tavanneet
4 siivo|ta sinä et ole siivonnut te ette ole siivonneet
5 tarvi|ta hän ei ole tarvinnut he eivät ole tarvinneet
5 vali|ta sinä et ole valinnut te ette ole valinneet
6 pae|ta minä en ole paennut me emme ole paenneet
6 lämme|tä se ei ole lämmennyt ne eivät ole lämmenneet

Comparing this table to the one for the negative imperfect tense will show that both are very similar. For the perfect tense, you just add the form ole.

Back to top

4. Negative Plusquamperfect Tense

The sentence “En tullut, koska en ollut vielä syönyt” contains an example of the negative plusquamperfect tense. The sentence means “I didn’t come because I hadn’t eaten yet”. You mainly use the plusquamperfect when you have a situation where there are two past events.

The plusquamperfect consists of two parts. It has the imperfect conjugation of the verb olla (eg. olimme, olitte) combined with the NUT-participle of the main verb (eg. asunut, menneet).

When making the plusquamperfect tense negative, you need three elements. You will need the negative verb ei (conjugated), combined with ollut in the singular and olleet in the plural, as well as the NUT-participle of your main verb. That’s how you get, for example, the form “en ollut syönyt“.

  • In the singular forms minä, sinä and hän the verb gets -nut or -nyt (vowel harmony).
  • In the plural forms me, te and he you will have -neet.
Affirmative Negative English
minä olin puhunut minä en ollut puhunut I hadn’t spoken
sinä olit puhunut sinä et ollut puhunut you (singular) hadn’t spoken
hän oli puhunut hän ei ollut puhunut he/she hadn’t spoken
me olimme puhuneet me emme olleet puhuneet we hadn’t spoken
te olitte puhuneet te ette olleet puhuneet you (plural) hadn’t spoken
he eivät puhuneet he eivät olleet puhuneet they hadn’t spoken

Negative Plusquamperfect Tense Examples

The following table displays some example verbs in both a random singular form (minä, sinä or hän) and in a random plural form (me, te or he). The column labeled VT contains the number of each verb’s verbtype. Some letters have been highlighted in green to show their deviation from the general -nut/-nyt/-neet ending.

VT Verb Singular example Plural example
1 kysy|ä minä en ollut kysynyt me emme olleet kysyneet
1 nukku|a minä en ollut nukkunut te ette olleet nukkuneet
2 juo|da hän ei ollut juonut te ette olleet juoneet
2 syö|dä sinä et ollut syönyt he eivät olleet syöneet
3 opiskel|la minä en ollut opiskellut he eivät olleet opiskelleet
3 pur|ra sinä et ollut purrut me emme olleet purreet
3 pes|tä hän ei ollut pessyt te ette olleet pesseet
4 tava|ta minä en ollut tavannut he eivät olleet tavanneet
4 siivo|ta sinä et ollut siivonnut te ette olleet siivonneet
5 tarvi|ta hän ei ollut tarvinnut he eivät olleet tarvinneet
5 vali|ta sinä et ollut valinnut te ette olleet valinneet
6 pae|ta minä en ollut paennut me emme olleet paenneet
6 lämme|tä se ei ollut lämmennyt ne eivät olleet lämmenneet

Comparing this table to the one for the perfect tense will show that both are very similar. Compared to the perfect tense, the only difference is that the verb olla is now ollut (in the singular) or olleet (in the plural) rather than ole.

Back to top

5. Negative Conditional

The following sentence contains two negative conditional forms: “Minä en tulisi, jos ei olisi pakko tulla“, which translates as: “I wouldn’t come if it wasn’t obligatory to come”. The conditional mood is often used in sentences that express hypothetical situations.

The positive conditional’s main verb (eg. puhuisin) will lose its personal ending -n when you make the sentence negative (eg. puhuisi-). The negative verb will be conjugated (eg. minä en, me emme).

Affirmative Negative Meaning
minä puhuisin minä en puhuisi I wouldn’t speak
sinä puhuisit sinä et puhuisi you (singular) wouldn’t speak
hän puhuisi hän ei puhuisi he/she wouldn’t speak
me puhuisimme me emme puhuisi we wouldn’t speak
te puhuisitte te ette puhuisi you (plural) wouldn’t speak
he puhuisivat he eivät puhuisi they wouldn’t speak

The conditional is always strong, both in the positive and the negative conditional. This is true for all verbtypes.

  • lukea : minä lukisin : me emme lukisi , he eivät lukisi
  • kuunnella: minä kuuntelisin : minä en kuuntelisi, hän ei kuuntelisi
  • tykätä : minä tykkäisin : minä en tykkäisi, me emme tykkäisi

Negative Conditional Examples

The following table displays some example verbs in both the affirmative minä-form of the conditional and a random negative conditional form. The column labeled VT contains information of each verb’s verbtype. The -n marked in green in the affirmative column will be removed to find the negative form.

VT Verb Affirmative Negative Meaning
1 kysyä minä kysyisi|n minä en kysyisi I wouldn’t ask
1 nukkua minä nukkuisi|n hän ei nukkuisi he/she wouldn’t sleep
2 juoda minä joisi|n minä en joisi I wouldn’t drink
2 syödä minä söisi|n minä en isi I wouldn’t eat
2 tehdä minä tekisi|n sinä et tekisi you wouldn’t do/make
3 opiskella minä opiskelisi|n minä en opiskelisi I wouldn’t study
3 mennä minä menisi|n me emme menisi we wouldn’t go
3 ajatella minä ajattelisi|n minä en ajattelisi I wouldn’t think
4 tavata minä tapaisi|n te ette tapaisi you (plural) wouldn’t meet
4 siivota minä siivoaisi|n he eivät siivoaisi they wouldn’t clean
5 tarvita minä tarvitsisi|n minä en tarvitsisi I wouldn’t need
5 valita minä valitsisi|n me emme valitsisi we wouldn’t choose
6 paeta minä pakenisi|n minä en pakenisi I wouldn’t escape
6 lämmetä minä lämpenisi|n se ei lämpenisi it wouldn’t get warmer

6. Negative Perfect Conditional

The sentence “Minä en olisi tullut, jos et olisi soittanut” contains two examples of the negative perfect conditional. The sentence means “I wouldn’t have come if you wouldn’t have called“.

The perfect tense always consists of two elements: the verb olla and the NUT-participle of the main verb (eg. olen asunut, olemme menneet). In the perfect conditional, we use the conditional form of the verb olla (eg. olisin, olisimme) rather than the present tense, which gives us forms such as olisin asunut and olisimme menneet.

When conjugating verbs in the negative perfect conditional, you will use the negative verb ei combined with the negative form conditional of the verb olla (eg. olisin, olisimme) and the NUT-participle.

  • In the singular forms minä, sinä and hän the verb gets -nut or -nyt (vowel harmony).
  • In the plural forms me, te and he you will have -neet.
Affirmative Negative English
minä olisin puhunut minä en olisi puhunut I wouldn’t have spoken
sinä olisit puhunut sinä et olisi puhunut you (singular) wouldn’t have spoken
hän olisi puhunut hän ei olisi puhunut he/she wouldn’t have spoken
me olisimme puhuneet me emme olisi puhuneet we wouldn’t have spoken
te olisitte puhuneet te ette olisi puhuneet you (plural) wouldn’t have spoken
he olisivat puhuneet he eivät olisi puhuneet they wouldn’t have spoken

Negative Perfect Conditional Examples

The following table displays some example verbs in both a random singular form (minä, sinä or hän) and a random plural form (me, te or he). The number in the column labeled VT is the verbtype of the verb in question. Some letters have been highlighted in green to show their deviation from the general -nut/-nyt/-neet ending.

VT Verb Singular example Plural example
1 kysy|ä minä en olisi kysynyt me emme olisi kysyneet
1 nukku|a minä en olisi nukkunut te ette olisi nukkuneet
2 juo|da hän ei olisi juonut te ette olisi juoneet
2 syö|dä sinä et olisi syönyt he eivät olisi syöneet
3 opiskel|la minä en olisi opiskellut he eivät olisi opiskelleet
3 pur|ra sinä et olisi purrut me emme olisi purreet
3 pes|tä hän ei olisi pessyt te ette olisi pesseet
4 tava|ta minä en olisi tavannut he eivät olisi tavanneet
4 siivo|ta sinä et olisi siivonnut te ette olisi siivonneet
5 tarvi|ta hän ei olisi tarvinnut he eivät olisi tarvinneet
5 vali|ta sinä et olisi valinnut te ette olisi valinneet
6 pae|ta minä en olisi paennut me emme olisi paenneet
6 lämme|tä se ei olisi lämmennyt ne eivät olisi lämmenneet

Back to top

7. Negative Singular Imperative

The imperative is used to give orders or to forbid something. A sentence with a negative singular imperative would be, for example, “Älä unohda käyttää kasvomaskia!” (Don’t forget to use a face mask!). The imperative’s singular and plural forms are quite different so they each get their own section in this article.

For the negative singular imperative, you will use älä instead of eg. ei or emme. The main verb will simply look the same as in the affirmative singular imperative (eg. nuku > älä nuku).

The imperative can be both weak (eg. Älä nuku) and strong (eg. Älä ompele) depending on the verbtype. If you’ve studied the affirmative imperative, just use the same form for the negative. The easiest way to find the correct form is to conjugate the verb in the present tense’s minä-form. For example:

  • Nukkua get conjugated as minä nukun, so it becomes älä nuku.
  • Ommella gets conjugated as minä ompelen, so it becomes älä ompele.
  • Tykätä gets conjugates as minä tykkään, so it becomes älä tykkää.
VT Verb Affirmative Negative Meaning
1 kysyä Kysy! Älä kysy! Don’t ask!
1 nukkua Nuku! Älä nuku! Don’t sleep!
2 juoda Juo! Älä juo! Don’t drink!
2 syödä Syö! Älä syö! Don’t eat!
2 tehdä Tee! Älä tee! Don’t do/make!
3 opiskella Opiskele! Älä opiskele! Don’t study!
3 mennä Mene! Älä mene! Don’t go!
3 ajatella Ajattele! Älä ajattele! Don’t think!
4 tavata Tapaa! Älä tapaa! Don’t meet!
4 siivota Siivoa! Älä siivoa! Don’t clean!
5 häiritä Häiritse! Älä häiritse! Don’t disturb!
5 valita Valitse! Älä valitse! Don’t choose!
6 paeta Pakene! Älä pakene! Don’t escape!
6 lämmetä Lämpene! Älä lämpene! Don’t get warmer!

You can find useful example sentences of the negative imperative here.

Back to top

8. Negative Plural Imperative

The plural imperative is used to give an order (eg. Tulkaa!) or forbid (eg. Älkää tulko!) something to more than one person. It’s also used to be more polite to one person. We could for example say Olkaa hyvä to an elderly person instead of Ole hyvä.

When conjugating verbs in the negative plural imperative, you will use a combination of two elements. The negative verb ei will become älkää, while the main verb will get the element -ko/kö added to its infinitive stem (despite the similarity, this is not the question particle -ko/kö).

Consonant gradation for the plural imperative mirrors the basic form (infinitive) of the verb. For example, the infinitive nukkua has two k‘s, so the plural imperative will also have two k’s: nukkukaa and älkää nukkuko. In contrast, the verb tavata has a –v– in the basic form, which will be reflected in the plural imperative: tavatkaa and älkää tavatko.

In the table below, you can find information about what verbtype a verb belongs to in the VT column. For the translation, please keep in mind that this is the plural form: you’re talking to multiple people, or alternatively being very polite to one person.

VT Verb Affirmative Negative Meaning
1 kysy|ä Kysy|kää! Älkää kysy! Don’t ask!
1 nukku|a Nukku|kaa! Älkää nukkuko! Don’t sleep!
2 juo|da Juo|kaa! Älkää juoko! Don’t drink!
2 syö|dä Syö|kää! Älkää syö! Don’t eat!
2 teh|dä Teh|kää! Älkää teh! Don’t do/make!
3 opiskel|la Opiskel|kaa! Älkää opiskelko! Don’t study!
3 men|nä Men|kää! Älkää men! Don’t go!
3 ajatel|la Ajatel|kaa! Älkää ajatelko! Don’t think!
4 tavat|a Tavat|kaa! Älkää tavatko! Don’t meet!
4 siivot|a Siivot|kaa! Älkää siivotko! Don’t clean!
5 häirit|ä Häirit|kää! Älkää häirit! Don’t disturb!
5 valit|a Valit|kaa! Älkää valitko! Don’t choose!
6 paet|a Paet|kaa! Älkää paetko! Don’t escape!
6 lämmet|ä Lämmet|kää! Älkää lämmet! Don’t get warmer!

9. Negative Third Person Imperatives

The third person imperative (jussiivi) is very rare. It’s meant for advanced learners. For the sake of completeness, I’m adding it here, but as a beginner or intermediate student, I recommend you glance over these forms for now. We could respond to the statement “Mikko ei tule” with “Älköön tulko sitten” to express that we don’t care if he comes or not.

There is both a third person singular and third person plural imperative in Finnish. For the singular your negative verb will become älköön, while in the plural you use älkööt. The main verb will get -ko/kö just like in the (regular) plural imperative.

VT Verb Singular Negative Plural Negative
1 kysy|ä Älköön kysy! Älkööt kysy!
1 nukku|a Älköön nukkuko! Älkööt nukkuko!
2 juo|da Älköön juoko! Älkööt juoko!
2 syö|dä Älköön syö! Älkööt syö!
2 teh|dä Älköön teh! Älkööt teh!
3 opiskel|la Älköön opiskelko! Älkööt opiskelko!
3 men|nä Älköön men! Älkööt men!
3 ajatel|la Älköön ajatelko! Älkööt ajatelko!
4 tavat|a Älköön tavatko! Älkööt tavatko!
4 siivot|a Älköön siivotko! Älkööt siivotko!
5 häirit|ä Älköön häirit! Älkööt häirit!
5 valit|a Älköön valitko! Älkööt valitko!
6 paet|a Älköön paetko! Älkööt paetko!
6 lämmet|ä Älköön lämmet! Älkööt lämmet!

Back to top

10. Negative Potential Mood

The potential mood is a topic for advanced learners of Finnish. It’s used to express that something is likely to happen. The phrase “Hän ei puhune” means “He probably doesn’t speak”. It’s only rarely used.

The positive potential’s verb (eg. puhunen) will lose its personal ending -n when you make the sentence negative (eg. puhune-). The negative verb will be conjugated (eg. minä en, me emme).

Affirmative Negative Meaning
minä puhunen minä en puhune I probably don’t speak
sinä puhunet sinä et puhune you (singular) probably don’t speak
hän puhunee hän ei puhune he/she probably doesn’t speak
me puhunemme me emme puhune we probably don’t speak
te puhunette te ette puhune you (plural) probably don’t speak
he puhunevat he eivät puhune they probably don’t speak

The potential will always have the same type of consonant gradation as the basic form (infinitive)

  • lukea : minä lukenen : minä en lukene , he eivät lukene
  • kuunnella: minä kuunnellen : minä en kuunnelle, hän ei kuunnelle
  • tykätä : minä tykännen : minä en tykänne, me emme tykänne

Negative Potential Examples

The following table displays some example verbs in a random affirmative and negative potential form. The column labeled VT contains the number of each verb’s verbtype. The letters marked in green in the affirmative column will be removed to find the negative form.

VT Verb Affirmative Negative Meaning
1 kysyä minä kysyne|n minä en kysyne I probably don’t ask
1 nukkua sinä nukkune|t sinä et nukkune you (singular) probably don’t sleep
2 juoda hän juone|e hän ei juone he/she probably doesn’t drink
2 syödä me syöne|mme me emme syöne we probably don’t eat
2 tehdä te tehne|tte te ette tehne you (plural) probably don’t do
3 opiskella he opiskelle|vat he eivät opiskelle they probably don’t study
3 mennä minä menne|n minä en menne I probably don’t go
3 ajatella sinä ajatelle|t sinä et ajatelle you (singular) probably don’t think
4 tavata hän tavanne|e hän ei tavanne he/she probably doesn’t meet
4 siivota me siivonne|mme me emme siivonne we probably don’t clean
5 tarvita te tarvinne|tte te ette tarvinne you (plural) probably don’t need
5 valita he valinne|vat he eivät valinne they probably don’t choose
6 paeta minä paenne|n minä en paenne I probably don’t escape
6 lämmetä se lämmenne|e se ei lämmene it probably doesn’t get warmer

Back to top

11. Negative Perfect Potential

The potential mood can also be conjugated in the perfect tense. For example, the sentence “Hän ei liene puhunut asiasta” means “he probably hasn’t talked about it.” This is a very rare form.

The perfect potential consists of two elements: the verb olla in the potential form (eg. minä lienen) and the NUT-participle of the main verb (eg. lienen asunut, lienemme menneet). The NUT-participle remains the same in both the affirmative and the negative sentence.

Affirmative Negative Meaning
minä lienen puhunut minä en liene puhunut I probably wouldn’t have spoken
sinä lienet puhunut sinä et liene puhunut you (singular) probably wouldn’t have spoken
hän lienee puhunut hän ei liene puhunut he/she probably wouldn’t have spoken
me lienemme puhuneet me emme liene puhuneet we probably wouldn’t have spoken
te lienette puhuneet te ette liene puhuneet you (plural) probably wouldn’t have spoken
he lienevät puhuneet he eivät liene puhuneet they probably wouldn’t have spoken

Negative Potential Examples

The following table displays some example verbs in a random singular and a random plural form. Note how we use -nut/nyt in the singular forms and -neet in the plural forms. This same pattern should already be familiar to you from the perfect tense.

The column labeled VT contains the number of each verb’s verbtype.

VT Verb Singular example Plural example
1 kysy|ä minä en liene kysynyt me emme liene kysyneet
1 nukku|a minä en liene nukkunut te ette liene nukkuneet
2 juo|da hän ei liene juonut te ette liene juoneet
2 syö|dä sinä et liene syönyt he eivät liene syöneet
3 opiskel|la minä en liene opiskellut he eivät liene opiskelleet
3 pur|ra sinä et liene purrut me emme liene purreet
3 pes|tä hän ei liene pessyt te ette liene pesseet
4 tava|ta minä en liene tavannut he eivät liene tavanneet
4 siivo|ta sinä et liene siivonnut te ette liene siivonneet
5 tarvi|ta hän ei liene tarvinnut he eivät liene tarvinneet
5 vali|ta sinä et liene valinnut te ette liene valinneet
6 pae|ta minä en liene paennut me emme liene paenneet
6 lämme|tä se ei liene lämmennyt ne eivät liene lämmenneet

Back to top

PASSIVE FORMS

1. Negative Passive Present Tense

The sentence “Talvella ei syödä jäätelöä” means “In winter one doesn’t eat icecream” or “In winter icecream isn’t eaten“. This is an example of the most typical usage of the passive. In spoken language, the passive is used instead of the -mme form of verbs (eg. me puhumme becomes me puhutaan).

The negative present passive is formed using the third person of the negative verb: ei. The main verb will look like the affirmative passive without the final –an/än.

The following table contains examples of both the affirmative and the negative passive. The column labeled with VT shows what verbtype each verb belongs to. I’m only giving one translation, but keep in mind that the passive has several different functions in Finnish. I have refrained from translating verbtype 6 verbs because they aren’t as suitable for generic passive sentences (because they’re not object verbs).

VT Verb Affirmative Negative Meaning
1 tietää tiedetä|än ei tiedetä isn’t known
1 ottaa oteta|an ei oteta isn’t taken
2 juoda juoda|an ei juoda isn’t drunk
2 syöda syödä|än ei syödä isn’t eaten
3 opiskella opiskella|an ei opiskella isn’t studied
3 ommella ommella|an ei ommella isn’t sewn
4 tavata tavata|an ei tavata isn’t met
4 siivota siivota|an ei siivota isn’t cleaned
5 tarvita tarvita|an ei tarvita isn’t needed
5 valita valita|an ei valita isn’t chosen
6 vaaleta vaaleta|an ei vaaleta
6 lämmetä lämmetä|än ei lämmetä

As you can see from the table above, the negative passive of most verbs looks exactly like the basic form of the verb (eg. opiskella : ei opiskella). However, verbs that belong to verbtype 1 will not follow this pattern. The following table demonstrates more clearly what happens for verbtype 1 verbs in the passive.

VT Verb Affirmative Negative Meaning
1 puhua puhuta|an ei puhuta isn’t spoken
1 lukea lueta|an ei lueta isn’t read
1 tietää tiedetä|än ei tiede isn’t known
1 maksaa makseta|an ei makseta isn’t paid
1 rakastaa rakasteta|an ei rakasteta isn’t loved
1 ottaa oteta|an ei oteta isn’t taken

Back to top

2. Negative Passive Imperfect Tense

The negative passive imperfect sentence “Tätä takkia ei käytetty eilen” means “This coat wasn’t used yesterday”. The past tense’s negative passive form consists of ei (the third person singular of the “negative verb”), followed by the TU-participle of the main verb (eg. ei käytetty). Read more about the past passive here!

In the table below, you can find the verbtype each verb belongs to (VT), the affirmative past passive, the negative past passive and one possible translation for the negative phrase.

When comparing, you can see that the –tiin of the affirmative form gets replaced with –tu/ty for the negative form. The number of t‘s depends on the verbtype, and will be the same in both the affirmative and the negative form. Verbtypes 2 and 3 will have -tu/ty, while verbtypes 1, 4, 5 and 6 will have -ttu/tty.

The passive has several functions, so these forms can be translated in different ways as well. I have refrained from translating verbtype 6 verbs because they aren’t as suitable for generic passive sentences (because they’re not object verbs). Read more about the usage of the passive here.

VT Finnish Affirmative Negative Meaning
1 tietää tiedettiin ei tiedetty wasn’t known
1 ottaa otettiin ei otettu wasn’t taken
2 juoda juotiin ei juotu wasn’t drunk
2 syödä syötiin ei syöty wasn’t eaten
3 opiskella opiskeltiin ei opiskeltu wasn’t studied
3 ommella ommeltiin ei ommeltu wasn’t sewn
4 tavata tavattiin ei tavattu wasn’t met
4 siivota siivottiin ei siivottu wasn’t cleaned
5 tarvita tarvittiin ei tarvittu wasn’t needed
5 valita valittiin ei valittu wasn’t chosen
6 vaaleta vaalettiin ei vaalettu
6 lämmetä lämmettiin ei lämmetty

Back to top

3. Negative Passive Perfect Tense

The verb in the sentence “Tätä takkia ei ole koskaan käytetty” (This coat has never been used) has been written in the negative perfect tense’s passive form.

This perfect tense consists of the verb olla in the third person singular (ie. on) and the TU-participle of the main verb (eg. käyttää > käytetty). When you make this construction negative, the first element will become negative: on becomes ei ole. The main verb will remain in the TU-participle. That’s how you get the negative passive perfect tense: “ei ole käytetty“.

In the table below, you can find the verbtype each verb belongs to (VT), the affirmative passive perfect form, the negative passive perfect form and one possible translation for the negative phrase.

VT Finnish Affirmative Negative Meaning
1 tietää on tiedetty ei ole tiedetty hasn’t been known
1 ottaa on otettu ei ole otettu hasn’t been taken
2 juoda on juotu ei ole juotu hasn’t been drunk
2 syödä on syöty ei ole syöty hasn’t been eaten
3 opiskella on opiskeltu ei ole opiskeltu hasn’t been studied
3 ommella on ommeltu ei ole ommeltu hasn’t been sewn
4 tavata on tavattu ei ole tavattu hasn’t been met
4 siivota on siivottu ei ole siivottu hasn’t been cleaned
5 tarvita on tarvittu ei ole tarvittu hasn’t been needed
5 valita on valittu ei ole valittu hasn’t been chosen
6 vaaleta on vaalettu ei ole vaalettu
6 lämmetä on lämmetty ei ole lämmetty

In spoken language, a double passive form is also regularly used, although it is technically incorrect. As the name implies, this form has two passive forms: both the verb olla and the main verb will be conjugated in the passive. For example, instead of “ei ole tavattu“, the form “ei olla tavattu” is used in spoken language.

Back to top

4. Negative Passive Plusquamperfect Tense

The sentence “Kun palasin keittiöön, ruokaa ei ollut syöty” contains an example of the negative passive plusquamperfect. It translates as “When I returned to the kitchen, the food hadn’t been eaten“. The passive plusquamperfect tense consists of three verbal elements: the negative verb ei (the third person singular), the verb olla (more specifically the form ollut), and the TU-participle of the main verb (eg. syödä > syöty).

In the table below, you can find the verbtype each verb belongs to (VT), the affirmative passive plusquamperfect form, the negative passive plusquamperfect form and one possible translation for the negative phrase.

VT Finnish Affirmative Negative English
1 tietää oli tiedetty ei ollut tiedetty hadn’t been known
1 ottaa oli otettu ei ollut otettu hadn’t been taken
2 juoda oli juotu ei ollut juotu hadn’t been drunk
2 syödä oli syöty ei ollut syöty hadn’t been eaten
3 opiskella oli opiskeltu ei ollut opiskeltu hadn’t been studied
3 ommella oli ommeltu ei ollut ommeltu hadn’t been sewn
4 tavata oli tavattu ei ollut tavattu hadn’t been met
4 siivota oli siivottu ei ollut siivottu hadn’t been cleaned
5 tarvita oli tarvittu ei ollut tarvittu hadn’t been needed
5 valita oli valittiin ei ollut valittu hadn’t been chosen
6 vaaleta oli vaalettiin ei ollut vaalettu
6 lämmetä oli lämmettiin ei ollut lämmetty

In spoken language, a double passive form is also regularly used, although it is technically incorrect. This form has two passive forms: both the verb olla and the main verb will be conjugated in the passive. For example, instead of “ei ollut tavattu“, the form “ei oltu tavattu” is also used in spoken language.

Back to top

5. Negative Passive Conditional

Ruokaa ei syötäisi, jos kertoisin kuka teki sitä” is an example of the negative passive conditional and means “The food wouldn’t be eaten if I would tell who made it”.

For the passive conditional‘s negative form, you use the negative verb ei (the third person singular). The main verb will look like the affirmative form (eg. syötäisiin) with the last two letters -in removed (ie. syötäisi).

VT Verb Affirmative Negative Meaning
1 tietää tiedettäisi|in ei tiedettäisi wouldn’t be known
1 ottaa otettaisi|in ei otettaisi wouldn’t be taken
2 juoda juotaisi|in ei juotaisi wouldn’t be drunk
2 syödä syötäisi|in ei syötäisi wouldn’t be eaten
3 opiskella opiskeltaisi|in ei opiskeltaisi wouldn’t be studied
3 ommella ommeltaisi|in ei ommeltaisi wouldn’t be sewn
4 tavata tavattaisi|in ei tavattaisi wouldn’t be met
4 siivota siivottaisi|in ei siivottaisi wouldn’t be cleaned
5 tarvita tarvittaisi|in ei tarvittaisi wouldn’t be needed
5 valita valittaisi|in ei valittaisi wouldn’t be chosen
6 paeta paettaisi|in ei paettaisi
6 lämmetä lämmettäisi|in ei lämmettäisi

In spoken language, the same form is often used for both the positive and the negative form. You can hear, for example for the verb syödä, the sentences “Me syötäis mieluummin kotona” (We would rather eat at home) and “Me ei syötäis ravintolassa, jos…” (We wouldn’t eat in the restaurant if…).

Back to top

6. Negative Passive Perfect Conditional

Ruokaa ei olisi syöty, jos olisin kertonut kuka oli tehnyt sitä” is an example of the negative passive perfect conditional and means “The food wouldn’t have been eaten if I would have told who had made it”.

For the passive perfect conditional’s negative form, you use the negative verb ei (the third person singular), followed by olisi. The main verb will be in its TU-participle form.

VT Verb Affirmative Negative Meaning
1 tietää olisi tiedetty ei olisi tiedetty wouldn’t have been known
1 ottaa olisi otettu ei olisi otettu wouldn’t have been taken
2 juoda olisi juotu ei olisi juotu wouldn’t have been drunk
2 syödä olisi syöty ei olisi syöty wouldn’t have been eaten
3 opiskella olisi opiskeltu ei olisi opiskeltu wouldn’t have been studied
3 ommella olisi ommeltu ei olisi ommeltu wouldn’t have been sewn
4 tavata olisi tavattu ei olisi tavattu wouldn’t have been met
4 siivota olisi siivottu ei olisi siivottu wouldn’t have been cleaned
5 tarvita olisi tavittu ei olisi tarvittu wouldn’t have been needed
5 valita olisi valittu ei olisi valittu wouldn’t have been chosen
6 paeta olisi paettu ei olisi paettu
6 lämmetä olisi lämmetty ei olisi lämmetty

In spoken language, a double passive form is also regularly used, although it is technically incorrect. This form has two passive forms: both the verb olla and the main verb will be conjugated in the passive. For example, instead of “ei olisi tavattu“, the form “ei oltaisi tavattu” is also used in spoken language.

Back to top

7. Negative Passive Imperative

Another very rare form! The negative passive imperfect is used, for example, in the sentence “Mitään työtä älköön tehtäkö niinä päivinä“, which is a biblical phrase which means “Let no work be done on these days”. This form is pretty archaic and it’s extremely unlikely that you will come across it any everyday life situations.

VT Verb Affirmative Negative Meaning
1 tietää tiedettä|ön älköön tiedettä don’t let it be known
1 ottaa otettako|on älköön otettako don’t let it be taken
2 juoda juotako|on älköön juotako don’t let it be drunk
2 syödä syötä|ön älköön syötä don’t let it be eaten
3 opiskella opiskeltako|on älköön opiskeltako don’t let it be studied
3 ommella ommeltako|on älköön ommeltako don’t let it be sewn
4 tavata tavattako|on älköön tavattako don’t let it be met
4 siivota siivottako|on älköön siivottako don’t let it be cleaned
5 tarvita tarvittako|on älköön tarvittako don’t let it be needed
5 valita valittako|on älköön valittako don’t let it be chosen
6 paeta paettako|on älköön paettako
6 lämmetä lämmettäko|on alköön  lämmettä

Back to top

8. Negative Passive Potential

Vastausta ei tiedettäne vielä” is an example of the negative passive potential and means “The answer probably isn’t known yet”. The potential is used to express that something is likely to happen. The negative passive potential expresses that something probably hasn’t been done.

To create the passive potential’s negative form, you use the negative verb ei (the third person singular). The main verb will look like the affirmative form (eg. tiedettäneen) with the last two letters -en removed (so, tiedettäne).

VT Verb Affirmative Negative Meaning
1 tietää tiedettäne|en ei tiedettäne probably isn’t known
1 ottaa otettane|en ei otettane probably isn’t taken
2 juoda juotane|en ei juotane probably isn’t drunk
2 syödä syötäne|en ei syötäne probably isn’t eaten
3 opiskella opiskeltane|en ei opiskeltane probably isn’t studied
3 ommella ommeltane|en ei ommeltane probably isn’t sewn
4 tavata tavattane|en ei tavattane probably isn’t met
4 siivota siivottane|en ei siivottane probably isn’t cleaned
5 tarvita tarvittane|en ei tarvittane probably isn’t needed
5 valita valittane|en ei valittane probably isn’t chosen
6 paeta paettane|en ei paettane
6 lämmetä lämmettäne|en ei lämmettäne

Back to top

Read more elsewhere

5 1 vote
Article Rating
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

2 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Marcin

In section 7:

Ommella gets conjugated as minä ompelen, so it becomes älä valehtele.

It should be älä ompele.

Inge (admin)

Yes! This one was tough to proof-read without losing focus. Kiitos paljon 🙂